National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 1,358 Matching Results

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Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Description: This paper is one of several dealing with methods intended to reduce the drag of present-day radial engine installations and improve the cooling at zero and low air speeds, The present paper describes model wind-tunnel tests of blowers of three designs tested in conjunction with a wing-nacelle combination. The principle of operation involved consists of drawing cooling air into ducts located in the wing root at the point of maximum slipstream velocity, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and exhausting the air through an annular slot located between the propeller and the engine with the aid of a blower mounted on the spinner. The test apparatus consisted essentially of a stub wing having a 5-foot chord and a 15-foot span, an engine nacelle of 20 inches diameter enclosing a 25-horsepower electric motor, and three blowers mounted on propeller spinners. Two of the blowers utilize centrifugal force while the other uses the lift from airfoils to force the air out radially through the exit slot. Maximum efficiencies of over 70 percent were obtained for the system as a whole. Pressures were measured over the entire flight range which were in excess of those necessary to cool present-day engines, The results indicated that blowers mounted on propeller spinners could be built sufficiently powerful and efficient to warrant their use as the only, or chief, means of forcing air through the cooling system, so that cooling would be independent of the speed of the airplane.
Date: June 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Description: Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.
Date: May 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Ducts for Radiators, Special Report

Description: Wing ducts for liquid-cooled engine radiators have been investigated in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel on a large model airplane. The tests were made to determine the relative merits of several types of duct and radiator installations for an airplane of a particular design. In the test program the principal duct dimensions were systematically varied, and the results are therefore somewhat applicable to the general problems of wing duct design, although they should be considered as preliminary and only indicative of the inherent possibilities.
Date: March 1938
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Nickle, F. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of Transparent Plastics for use on Aircraft. Supplement

Description: This supplement to a NACA study issued in May 1937 entitled "A Study of Transparent Plastics for Use on Aircraft", contains two tables. These tables contain data on bursting strengths of plastics, particularly at low temperatures. Table 1 contains the values reported in a table of the original memorandum, and additional values obtained at approximately 25 C, for three samples of Acrylate resin. The second table contains data obtained for the bursting strength when one surface of the plastic was cooled to approximately -35 C.
Date: August 1937
Creator: Axilrod, Benjamin M. & Kline, Gordon M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

Description: The Committee was requested to investigate the effect of various types of rivet heads on hydrodynamic resistance. The proposal was made to obtain the resistance of the various types of rivets by tests of planing surfaces on which the full size rivets would be arranged. The testing methods, results and conclusions are given.
Date: July 1935
Creator: Truscott, Starr & Parksinson, John B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ice Prevention on Aircraft by Means of Impregnated Leather Covers, Special Report

Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics is testing the effectiveness of a method to prevent the formation of ice on airplanes. The system makes use of a leather cover that is attached to the leading edge of the wing. A small tube, attached to the inner surface of the leather, distributes to the leading edge a solution that permeates throughout the leather and inhibits the formation of ice on the surface. About 25 pounds of the liquid per hour would be sufficient to prevent ice from forming on a wing of 50-foot span. The additional gross weight of the system will not be excessive. The tests are not yet completed but the method is thought to be practicable for the wing and it may also be adaptable to the propeller.
Date: August 1935
Creator: Clay, William C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Wind-Tunnel and Flight Tests of a Balanced Split Flap, Special Report

Description: One disadvantage that has been apparent in the operation of split flaps as used to date is the time and effort required to operate them. In this communication an investigation is being made of possible means for balancing them aerodynamically to make their operation easier. Several arrangements have been tested in the 7 by 210 foot wind tunnel, and the results of the wind-tunnel tests as well as preliminary flight tests on one of the more promising forms are given in this paper.
Date: August 1934
Creator: Weick, Fred E. & Thompson, Floyd L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints, 2, Lap Joints

Description: Tests have been made in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by four types of lap joint. The tests were made on an airfoil of NACA 23012 section and 5-foot chord and covered in a range of speeds from 80 to 500 miles per hour and lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. The increases in profile drag caused by representative arrangements of laps varied from 4 to 9%. When there were protruding rivet heads on the surface, the addition of laps increased the drag only slightly. Laps on the forward part of a wing increased the drag considerably more than those farther back.
Date: February 1938
Creator: Hood, Manley J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large-scale boundary-layer control tests on two wings in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel, special report

Description: Report discussing tests performed on two different wings to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and power required for the blower. The results for the stub wing were more favorable than the large-span wing.
Date: April 1935
Creator: Freeman, Hugh B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag, 3, Roughness

Description: Tests have been made in the N.A.C.A. 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by roughness on the surface of an airfoil of N.A.C.A. 23012 section and 5-foot chord. The tests were made at speeds from 80 t o 500 miles per hour at lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. For conditions corresponding to high-speed flight, the increase in the drag was 30 percent of the profile drag of the smooth airfoil for the roughness produced by spray painting and 63 percent for the roughness produced. by 0.0037-inch carborundum grains. About one-half the drag increase was caused by the roughness on the forward one-fourth of the airfoil. Sandpapering the painted surface with No. 400 sandpaper made it sufficiently smooth that the drag was no greater than when the surface was polished. In the lower part of the range investigated the drag due to roughness increased rapidly with Reynolds Number.
Date: February 1938
Creator: Hood, Manley J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air forces and air-force moments at large angles of attack and how they are affected by the shape of the wing

Description: From Summary: "The present report is, in the first place, a compilation of the test results now available from wing tests up to angles of attack 90^o. Reports are also given of tests with monoplane and auxiliary wings in the Gottingen wind tunnel for the purpose of plotting a steadily rising curve of the normal force as a foundation of the angle of attack."
Date: July 1930
Creator: Fuchs, Richard & Schmidt, Wilhelm
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. IV - Manufacturing Irregularities, 5, Manufacturing Irregularities

Description: Tests were made in the NACA 8-foot high speed wind tunnel of a metal-covered, riveted, 'service' wing of average workmanship to determine the aerodynamic effects of the manufacturing irregularities incident to shop fabrication. The wing was of 5-foot chord and of NACA 23012 section and was tested in the low-lift range at speeds from 90 to 450 miles per hour corresponding to Reynolds numbers from 4,000,000 to 18,000,000. At a cruising condition the drag of the service wing was 46% higher than the drag of a smooth airfoil, whereas the drag of an accurately constructed airfoil having the same arrangement of 3/32-inch brazier-head rivets and lap joints showed a 29% increase. The difference, or 17% of the smooth-wing drag, is apparently the drag caused by the manufacturing irregularities: sheet waviness, departures from true profile, and imperfect laps. the service wing, for one condition at least, showed a drag increase due to compressibility at a lower air speed than did the more accurate airfoil.
Date: February 1938
Creator: Robinson, Russell G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of Airfoils Designed to Delay the Compressibility Burble

Description: Development of airfoil sections suitable for high-speed applications has generally been difficult because little was known of the flow phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. A definite critical speed has been found at which serious detrimental flow changes occur that lead to serious losses in lift and large increases in drag. This flow phenomenon, called the compressibility burble, was originally a propeller problem, but with the development of higher speed aircraft serious consideration must be given to other parts of the airplane. Fundamental investigations of high-speed airflow phenomenon have provided new information. An important conclusion of this work has been the determination of the critical speed, that is, the speed at which the compressibility burble occurs. The critical speed was shown to be the translational velocity at which the sum of the translational velocity and the maximum local induced velocity at the surface of the airfoil or other body equals the local speed of sound. Obviously then higher critical speeds can be attained through the development of airfoils that have minimum induced velocity for any given value of the lift coefficient. Presumably, the highest critical speed will be attained by an airfoil that has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity or, in other words, a flat pressure distribution curve. The ideal airfoil for any given high-speed application is, then, that form which at its operating lift coefficient has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity. Accordingly, an analytical search for such airfoil forms has been conducted and these forms are now being investigated experimentally in the 23-inch high-speed wind tunnel. The first airfoils investigated showed marked improvement over those forms already available, not only as to critical speed buy also the drag at low speeds is decreased considerably. Because of the immediate marked improvement, it was considered desirable to extend the ...
Date: June 1939
Creator: Stack, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resume of Present Data on Load Distribution on Slots and Flaps, Special Report

Description: This report covers a study of the generally available data on load distribution on slots and flaps. The study was made by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the request of the Material Division, Army Air Corps to furnish information applicable to design criteria for slots and flaps of various types. The data are presented in three main sections: slots (Handley page type), auxiliary airfoils (fixed), and flaps.
Date: April 1934
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary model tests of a wing-duct cooling system for radial engines, special report

Description: From Summary: "Wind-tunnel tests were conducted on a model wing-nacelle combination to determine the practicability of cooling radial engines by forcing the cooling air into wing-duct entrances located in the propeller slipstream, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and ejecting the air through an annular slot near the front of the nacelle. The drag of the cowlings tested was definitely less than for the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling, and the pressure available at low air speed corresponding to operation on the ground and at low flying speeds was apparently sufficient for cooling most present-day radial engines."
Date: February 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wing-nacelle-propeller tests - comparative tests of liquid-cooled and air-cooled engine nacelles

Description: From Summary: "This report gives the results of measurements of the lift, drag, and propeller characteristics of several wing and nacelle combinations with a tractor propeller." The liquid-cooled engines appeared to have an advantage over the air-cooled engines.
Date: January 1934
Creator: Wood, Donald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department