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Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (16th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 337 to 364

Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Date: January 1, 1931
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (15th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 309 to 336

Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Date: January 1, 1930
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

Description: This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.
Date: 1933
Creator: Harris, Thomas A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activation of hydrocarbons and the octane number

Description: This report presents an examination of the history of research on engine knocking and the various types of fuels used in the investigations of this phenomenon. According to this report, the spontaneous ignition of hydrocarbons doped with oxygen follows the logarithmic law within a certain temperature range, but not above 920 degrees K. Having extended the scope of investigations to prove hydrocarbons, the curves of the mixtures burned by air should then be established by progressive replacement of pure iso-octane with heptane. Pentane was also examined in this report.
Date: October 1939
Creator: Peschard, Marcel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 1929 Rhon soaring-flight contest

Description: The limitation of the 1929 contest to performance gliders necessitated the establishment of a formula which would make it possible to distinguish between performance gliders and school and training gliders. The sinking speed was therefore adopted as the basis for such a distinction, and the requirement was made that the sinking speed of a performance glider should not exceed 0.8 m/s. The rest of the report details the different entries with regard to design and performance.
Date: April 1930
Creator: Lippisch, Alexander
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Charts expressing the time, velocity, and altitude relations for an airplane diving in a standard atmosphere

Description: In this report charts are given showing the relation between time, velocities, and altitude for airplanes having various terminal velocities diving in a standard atmosphere. The range of starting altitudes is from 8,000 to 32,000 feet, and the terminal velocities vary from 150 to 550 miles per hour. A comparison is made between an experimental case and the results obtained from the charts. Examples pointing out the use of the charts are included.
Date: April 1, 1937
Creator: Pearson, H A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Charts for determining the pitching moment of tapered wings with sweepback and twist

Description: This report presents a convenient method for calculating the pitching-moment characteristics of tapered wings with sweepback and twist. The method is based on the fact that the pitching-moment characteristics of a wing may be specified by giving the value of the pitching moment at zero lift and the location of the axis about which the axis is constant. Data for calculating these characteristics are presented by curves which apply to wings having a linear distribution of twist along the span and which cover a large range of aspect ratios. The curves are given for wings having straight taper and distorted elliptical plan forms. The characteristics of wings of other shapes may be determined by interpolation.
Date: December 1, 1933
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculations of the effect of wing twist on the air forces acting on a monoplane wing

Description: A method is presented for calculating the aerodynamic forces on a moncylane wing, taking into account the elastic twisting of the wing due to these forces. The lift distribution along the span is calculated by the formulas of Amstutz as a function of the geometrical characteristics of the wing and of the twist at stations 60 and 90 percent of the semispan. The twist for a given lift distribution is calculated by means of influence lines. As a numerical example, the forces on a Swiss military D.2V airplane are calculated. Comparisons with the strip method and with the ordinary stress-analysis method are also given.
Date: January 1, 1935
Creator: Datwyler, G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Complete Tank Test of a Model of a Flying-Boat Hull - N.A.C.A. Model No.11

Description: This note discusses the limitations of the conventional tank test of a seaplane model. The advantages of a complete test, giving the characteristics of the model at all speeds, loads, and trim angles in the useful range are pointed out. The data on N.A.C.A. Model No.11, obtained from a complete test, are presented and discussed. The results are analyzed to determine the best trim angle for each speed and load. The data for the best angles are reduced to non-dimensional form for ease of comparison and application. A practical problem using the characteristics of model no.11 is presented to show the method of calculating the take-off time and run of a seaplane from these data.
Date: July 1, 1933
Creator: Shoemaker, James M. & Parkinson, John B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The calculated effect of trailing-edge flaps on the take-off of flying boats

Description: The results of take-off calculations are given for an application of simple trailing-edge flaps to two hypothetical flying boats, one having medium wing and power loading and consequently considerable excess of thrust over total resistance during the take-off run, the other having high wing and power loading and a very low excess thrust. For these seaplanes the effect of downward flap settings was: (1) to increase the total resistance below the stalling speed, (2) to decrease the get-away speed, (3) to improve the take-off performance of the seaplane having considerable excess thrust, and (4) to hinder the take-off of the seaplane having low excess thrust. It is indicated that flaps would allow a decrease in the high angles of wing setting necessary with most seaplanes, provided that the excess thrust is not too low.
Date: November 1, 1934
Creator: Parkinson, J E & Bell, J W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculated effect of various types of flap on take-off over obstacles

Description: In order to determine whether or not flaps could be expected to have any beneficial effect on take-off performance, the distances required to take off and climb to an altitude of 50 feet were calculated for hypothetical airplanes, corresponding to relatively high-speed types and equipped with several types of flap. The types considered are the Fowler wing, the Hall wing, the split flap, the balanced split flap, the plain flap, and the external-airfoil flap. The results indicate that substantial reductions in take-off distance are possible through the use of flaps, provided that the proper flap angle corresponding to a given set of conditions is used. The best flap angle for taking off varies inversely as power loading and, to a much smaller extent, varies inversely with wing loading. Apparently, the best take-off characteristics are provided by the type of device in which the flap forms an extension to the main wing as in the case of the Fowler wing and the external-airfoil flap.
Date: May 1, 1936
Creator: Wetmore, J W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department