National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 132 Matching Results

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Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (13th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 257 to 282

Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Date: January 1, 1928
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 1926 German seaplane contest

Description: The report discusses the problem of rating the various seaplane designs from the 1926 seaplane contest. The whole process of rating consists in measuring the climbing speed, flying weight and carrying capacity of a seaplane and then using these data as the basis of a construction problem.
Date: March 1928
Creator: Seewald, F; Blenk, H & Liebers, F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The determination of several spray characteristics of a high-speed oil engine injection system with an oscilloscope

Description: An investigation was conducted to determine the injection lag, duration of injection, and spray start and cut-off characteristics of a fuel injection system operated on an engine and injecting fuel into the atmosphere.
Date: September 1, 1928
Creator: Hicks, Chester W & Moore, Charles S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The formation of ice upon exposed parts of an airplane in flight

Description: In order to experimentally study the conditions leading to ice formation on aircraft surfaces, an aircraft was equipped with small auxiliary surfaces and aerodynamic shapes similar to struts, wires, Pitot heads, etc. This airplane was flown at an altitude where a temperature of 32 F was encountered, at such times as cloud formations could be found at the coincident altitude. Here it was discovered that ice formed rapidly in regard to quantity,character, shape, and rapidity of formation. An examination of this data, which confirms observations of pilots, indicates that the weight of ice collected can very possibly be sufficient to force the airplane to rapidly lose altitude on account of the increased loads. However, it is more evident that the malformation of the aerodynamic shapes may so increase the drag and reduce the lift so as to produce a loss of altitude even greater in consequence, the combination of the two working in the same direction having a double effect. Other adverse consequences are noted. The recommendation for the guidance of those who must encounter these conditions appears to lie entirely along the lines of avoidance.
Date: July 1, 1928
Creator: Carroll, Thomas & Mcavoy, Wm H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resistance of streamline wires

Description: This note contains the results of tests to determine the resistance of four sizes of streamline wire. The investigation was conducted in the six-inch wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The tests were made at various velocities and it was found that the resistance of streamline wires was considerably less than that of round wires of equivalent strength. Scale effect was also found since, with an increase of Reynolds Number, a decrease in the resistance coefficient was obtained.
Date: March 1, 1928
Creator: Defoe, George L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of fillets between wings and fuselage on the drag and propulsive efficiency of an airplane

Description: Tests were made to determine the effect of fillets between wings and fuselage on the drag and propulsive efficiency of a high-wing cabin monoplane. These tests were made in the 20-foot Propeller Research Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Date: October 1, 1928
Creator: Gough, Melvin N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect on performance of a cutaway center section

Description: The assumption is made that a skeleton or cutaway center section is desirable for forward vision and to determine the effect of such mutilation upon performance the following work was done. The airplane used was a Vought VE-7 and in addition to the cutaway center section a system of end plates or fins was installed. Various conditions and combinations were investigated in level flight and in climb. It is found that the greatest difference in the conditions investigated was a drop of 12.5 per cent in a 10-minute climb while the effect upon level speeds was negligible.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Carroll, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A full-scale investigation of ground effect

Description: This report describes flight tests which were made with the Vought VE-7 airplane to determine the effects of flying close to the ground. It is found that the drag of an airplane is materially reduced upon approaching the ground and that the reduction may be satisfactorily calculated according to theoretical formulas. Several aspects of ground effect which have had much discussion are explained.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The reaction on a float bottom when making contact with water at high speeds

Description: Tests were conducted to investigate the possibility of a serious accident arising from unintentional contact with the water in substantially horizontal flight at high speed. Referring to vector diagrams on Figure 2, it will be seen that a very dangerous condition may arise if the float be allowed to come in contact with the water at high speeds as, for example, when flying at high speed just above the water. The initial diving moment due to suction and drag combined may be great enough to cause the seaplane to nose under before the pilot is able to control the motion. The same test data indicate clearly the existence of forces and moments tending to produce the phenomenon observed by Mr. Carroll (Technical Note No. 287) when the maneuver is carried out at lower speeds, as in a landing.
Date: May 1, 1928
Creator: Richardson, H C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion embrittlement of duralumin IV : the use of protective coatings

Description: Although the corrosion resistance of sheet duralumin can be greatly improved by suitable heat treatment, protection of the surface is still necessary if long life under varied service conditions is to be insured. The coatings used for this purpose may be grouped into three classes: the varnish type of coating, the oxide type produced by a chemical treatment of the surface, and metallic coatings, of which aluminum appears to be the most promising. Since the necessary weather exposure tests are not complete, some of the conclusions regarding the value of various surface coatings are necessarily tentative.
Date: April 1, 1928
Creator: Rawdon, Henry S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion embrittlement of duralumin III : effect of the previous treatment of sheet material on the susceptibility to this type of corrosion

Description: As a result of testing, it was determined that control of the rate of quenching and the avoidance of accelerated aging by heating are the only means of modifying duralumin itself so as to minimize the intercrystalline form of corrosive attack. It is so simple a means that it should be adopted even though it may not completely prevent, but only reduce, this form of corrosive attack. By so doing, the need for protection of the surface is less urgent.
Date: April 1, 1928
Creator: Rawdon, Henry S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion embrittlement of duralumin II : accelerated corrosion tests and the behavior of high-strength aluminum alloys of different compositions

Description: The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.
Date: April 1, 1928
Creator: Rawdon, Henry S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion embrittlement of duralumin I : practical aspects of the problem

Description: Since aircraft design is tending toward all-metal construction, the strong heat-treatable light aluminum alloy, duralumin (a generic name for a class of heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si), is finding increasing application. Doubt has been expressed concerning the reliability and permanence of these materials. Information is given on the effect of corrosion on the tensile properties of 14-gauge sheet duralumin, heat treated by quenching in hot water after being heated for 15 minutes in a fused nitrate bath at 500 to 510 C. Intercrystalline corrosion and practical aspects of intercrystalline embrittlement are discussed with respect to duralumin.
Date: April 1, 1928
Creator: Rawdon, Henry S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Helium tables.

Description: These tables are intended to provide a standard method and to facilitate the calculation of the quantity of "Standard Helium" in high pressure containers. The research data and the formulas used in the preparation of the tables were furnished by the Research Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Havill, Clinton H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure distribution on wing ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes in flight Part II : pull-ups

Description: This paper is the second of a series of notes, each of which presents the complete results of pressure distribution tests made at Langley Field by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, on wing and tail ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes for a particular maneuver of flight. The results for pull-ups are presented in the form of curves which show the variation of pressure distribution, total loads, normal acceleration and center of pressure with respect to time.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Rhode, R V
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lift, drag, and elevator hinge moments of Handley Page control surfaces

Description: This report combines the wind tunnel results of tests on four control surface models made in the two wind tunnels of the Navy Aerodynamic Laboratory, Washington Navy Yard, during the years of 1922 and 1924, and submitted for publication to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics May 7, 1927. The purpose of the tests was to compare, first, the lifts and the aerodynamic efficiencies of the control surfaces from which their relative effectiveness as tail planes could be determined; then the elevator hinge moments upon which their relative ease of operation depended. The lift and drag forces on the control surface models were obtained for various stabilizer angles and elevator settings in the 8 by 8 foot tunnel by the writer in 1922; the corresponding hinge moments were found in the 4 by 4 foot tunnel by Mr. R. M. Bear in 1924. (author).
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Smith, R H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Friction of aviation engines

Description: The first portion of this report discusses measurements of friction made in the altitude laboratory of the Bureau of Standards between 1920 and 1926 under research authorization of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. These are discussed with reference to the influence of speed, barometric pressure, jacket-water temperature, and throttle opening upon the friction of aviation engines. The second section of the report deals with measurements of the friction of a group of pistons differing from each other in a single respect, such as length, clearance, area of thrust face, location of thrust face, etc. Results obtained with each type of piston are discussed and attention is directed particularly to the fact that the friction chargeable to piston rings depends upon piston design as well as upon ring design. This is attributed to the effect of the rings upon the thickness and distribution of the oil film which in turn affects the friction of the piston to an extent which depends upon its design.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Sparrow, S W & Thorne, M A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Differential pressures on a Pitot-Venturi and a Pitot-static nozzle over 360 degrees pitch and yaw

Description: Measurements of the differential pressures on two navy air-speed nozzles, consisting of a Zahm type Pitot-Venturi tube and a SQ-16 two-pronged Pitot-static tube, in a tunnel air stream of fixed speed at various angles of pitch and yaw between 0 degrees and plus or minus 180 degrees. This shows for a range over -20 degrees to +20 degrees pitch and yaw, indicated air speeds varying very slightly over 2 per cent for the Zahm type and a maximum of about 5 per cent for the SQ-16 type from the calibrated speed at 0 degree. For both types of air-speed nozzle the indicated air speed increases slightly as the tubes are pitched or yawed several degrees from their normal 0 degrees altitude, attains a maximum around plus or minus 15 degrees to 25 degrees, declines rapidly therefrom as plus or minus 40 degrees is passed, to zero in the vicinity of plus or minus 70 degrees to 100 degrees, and thence fluctuates irregular from thereabouts to plus or minus 180 degrees. The complete variation in indicated air speed for the two tubes over 360 degree pitch and yaw is graphically portrayed in figures 9 and 10. For the same air speed and 0 degree pitch and yaw the differential pressure of the Zahm type Pitot-Venturi nozzle is about seven times that of the SQ-16 type two-prolonged Pitot-static nozzle.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Bear, R M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resistance and cooling power of various radiators

Description: This reports combines the wind tunnel results of radiator tests made at the Navy Aerodynamical Laboratory in Washington during the summers of 1921, 1925, and 1926. In all, 13 radiators of various types and capacities were given complete tests for figure of merit. Twelve of these were tested for resistance to water flow and a fourteenth radiator was tested for air resistance alone, its heat dissipating capacity being known. All the tests were conducted in the 8 by 8 foot tunnel, or in its 4 by 8 foot restriction, by the writer and under conditions as nearly the same as possible. That is to say, as far as possible, the general arrangement and condition of the apparatus, the observation intervals, the ratio of water flow per unit of cooling surface, the differential temperatures, and the air speeds were the same for all.
Date: January 1, 1928
Creator: Smith, R H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Welding of high chromium steels

Description: A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.
Date: June 1, 1928
Creator: Miller, W B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drag of exposed fittings and surface irregularities on airplane fuselages

Description: Measurements of drag were made on fittings taken from a typical fuselage to determine whether the difference between the observed full size fuselage drag and model fuselage drag could be attributed to the effects of fittings and surface irregularities found on the full size fuselage and not on the model. There are wide variations in the drag coefficients for the different fittings. In general those which protrude little from the surface or are well streamlined show very low and almost negligible drag. The measurements show, however, that a large part of the difference between model and full scale test results may be attributed to these fittings.
Date: March 1, 1928
Creator: Wood, Donald H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A dangerous seaplane landing condition

Description: A peculiar phenomena in seaplane landing is observed and reported. The seaplane having executed a normal fast landing at low incidence, a forward movement of the control stick effected an unusual condition in that the seaplane left the water suddenly in an abnormal attitude. The observations describing this phenomena are offered as a warning against possible accident and as a conjectural cause of seaplane landing accidents of a certain kind.
Date: May 1, 1928
Creator: Carroll, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department