National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 7,002 Matching Results

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Aerodynamic characteristics of damping screens

Description: From Summary: "The experimental investigation of damping screens described herein was undertaken primarily to test theories of the effects of damping screens and to obtain information on the performance of screens in oblique flow. The characteristics investigated include the damping of longitudinal and lateral components of turbulence, the effect of screens on scale, the conditions for the production of turbulence and eddies by screens, and the damping of spatial variations of mean speed."
Date: January 1950
Creator: Schubauer, G B; Spangenberg, W G & Klebanoff, P S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The aerodynamic forces on slender plane- and cruciform-wing and body combinations

Description: From Introduction: "Since these results were not applicable to the present problem, a theoretical analysis of the aerodynamic properties of slender wing-body combinations was undertaken. The results of this investigation were first reported in reference 5 and were later extended in reference 6 to include cruciform-wing and body combinations. The present report summarizes and extends the theory and results previously presented in these references."
Date: 1950?~
Creator: Spreiter, John R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of spanwise temperature distribution in three types of air-cooled turbine blade

Description: From Summary: An approximate method for determining the allowable stress-limited blade-temperature distribution is included, with brief accounts of a method for determining the maximum allowable effective gas temperatures and the cooling-air requirements. Numerical examples that illustrate the use of the various temperature-distribution equations and of the nondimensional charts are also included.
Date: 1950~
Creator: Livingood, John N B & Brown, W Byron
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of Green's theorem to the solution of boundary-value problems in linearized supersonic wing theory

Description: Following the introduction of the linearized partial differential equation for nonsteady three-dimensional compressible flow, general methods of solution are given for the two and three-dimensional steady-state and two-dimensional unsteady-state equations. It is also pointed out that, in the absence of thickness effects, linear theory yields solutions consistent with the assumptions made when applied to lifting-surface problems for swept-back plan forms at sonic speeds. The solutions of the particular equations are determined in all cases by means of Green's theorem, and thus depend on the use of Green's equivalent layer of sources, sinks, and doublets. Improper integrals in the supersonic theory are treated by means of Hadamard's "finite part" technique.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Heaslet, Max A & Lomax, Harvard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of radial-equilibrium condition to axial-flow compressor and turbine design

Description: Basic general equations governing the three-dimensional compressible flow of gas through a compressor or turbine are given in terms of total enthalpy, entropy, and velocity components of the gas. Two methods of solution are obtained for the simplified, steady axially symmetric flow; one involves the use of a number of successive planes normal to the axis of the machine and short distances apart, and the other involves only three stations for a stage in which an appropriate radial-flow path is used. Methods of calculation for the limiting cases of zero and infinite blade aspect ratios and an approximate method of calculation for finite blade aspect ratio are also given. In these methods, the blade loading and the shape of the annular passage wall may be arbitrarily specified.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Wu, Chung-Hua & Wolfenstein, Lincoln
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Blockage corrections for three-dimensional-flow closed-throat wind tunnels, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

Description: Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wing-tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Herriot, John G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The calculation of downwash behind supersonic wings with an application to triangular plan forms

Description: A method is developed consistent with the assumptions of small perturbation theory which provides a means of determining the downwash behind a wing in supersonic flow for a known load distribution. The analysis is based upon the use of supersonic doublets which are distributed over the plan form and wake of the wing in a manner determined from the wing loading. The equivalence in subsonic and supersonic flow of the downwash at infinity corresponding to a given load distribution is proved.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Lomax, Harvard; Sluder, Loma & Heaslet, Max A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of the aerodynamic loading of swept and unswept flexible wings of arbitrary stiffness

Description: A method is presented for calculating the aerodynamic loading, the divergence speed, and certain stability derivatives of swept and unswept wings and tail surfaces of arbitrary stiffness. Provision is made for using either stiffness curves and root rotation constants or structural influence coefficients in the analysis. Computing forms, tables of numerical constants required in the analysis, and an illustrative example are included to facilitate calculations by means of the method.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Diederich, Franklin W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of Instruments for Measuring Wind Velocity and Direction

Description: Signal Corps wind equipment AN/GMQ-1 consisting of a 3-cup anemometer and wind vane was calibrated for wind velocities from 1 to 200 miles per hour. Cup-shaft failure prevented calibration at higher wind velocities. The action of the wind vane was checked and found to have very poor directional accuracy below a velocity of 8 miles per hour. After shaft failure was reported to the Signal Corps, the cup rotors were redesigned by strengthening the shafts for better operation at high velocities. The anemometer with the redesigned cup rotors was recalibrated, but cup-shaft failure occurred again at a wind velocity of approximately 220 miles per hour. In the course of this calibration two standard generators were checked for signal output variation, and a wind-speed meter was calibrated for use with each of the redesigned cup rotors. The variation of pressure coefficient with air-flow direction at four orifices on a disk-shaped pitot head was obtained for wind velocities of 37.79 53.6, and 98.9 miles per hour. A pitot-static tube mounted in the nose of a vane was calibrated up to a dynamic pressure of 155 pounds per square foot, or approximately 256 miles per hour,.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Vogler, Raymond D. & Pilny, Miroslav J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparative drag measurements at transonic speeds of rectangular sweptback NACA 65-009 airfoils mounted on a freely falling body

Description: Directly comparable drag measurements have been made of an airfoil with a conventional rectangular plan form and an airfoil with a sweptback plan form mounted on freely falling bodies. Both airfoils had NACA 65-009 sections and were identical in span, frontal area, and chord perpendicular to the leading edge. The sweptback plan form incorporated a sweepback angle of 45 degrees. The data obtained have been used to establish the relation between the airfoil drag coefficients and the free-stream Mach number over a range of Mach numbers from 0.90 to 1.27. The results of the measurements indicate that the drag of the sweptback plan form is less than 0.3 that of the rectangular plan form at a Mach number of 1.00 and is less than 0.4 that at a Mach number of 1.20.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Mathews, Charles W & Thompson, Jim Rogers
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critical stress of ring-stiffened cylinders in torsion

Description: A chart in terms of nondimensional parameters is presented for the theoretical critical stress in torsion of simply supported cylinders stiffened by identical equally spaced rings of zero torsional stiffness. The results are obtained by solving the equation of equilibrium by means of the Galerkin method. Comparison of the theoretical results with experimental results indicates that ring-stiffened cylinders buckle, on the average, at a buckling stress about 15 percent below the theoretical buckling stress. (author).
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Stein, Manuel; Snaders, J Lyell, Jr & Crate, Harold
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of plate compressive strengths at elevated temperatures

Description: The results of local-instability tests of h-section plate assemblies and compressive stress-strain tests of extruded 75s-t6 aluminum alloy, obtained to determine flat-plate compressive strength under stabilized elevated temperature conditions, are given for temperatures up to 600 degrees F. The results show that methods available for calculating the critical compressive stress at room temperature can also be used at elevated temperatures if the applicable compressive stress-strain curve for the material is given.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Heimerl, George J & Roberts, William M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct method of design and stress analysis of rotating disks with temperature gradient

Description: A method is presented for the determination of the contour of disks, typified by those of aircraft gas turbines, to incorporate arbitrary elastic-stress distributions resulting from either centrifugal or combined centrifugal and thermal effects. The specified stress may be radial, tangential, or any combination of the two. Use is made of the finite-difference approach in solving the stress equations, the amount of computation necessary in the evolution of a design being greatly reduced by the judicious selection of point stations by the aid of a design chart. Use of the charts and of a preselected schedule of point stations is also applied to the direct problem of finding the elastic and plastic stress distribution in disks of a given design, thereby effecting a great reduction in the amount of calculation. Illustrative examples are presented to show computational procedures in the determination of a new design and in analyzing an existing design for elastic stress and for stresses resulting from plastic flow.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Manson, S S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Investigation of a 1/14-Scale Model of the Northrop C-125 Airplane

Description: An investigation of a 1/14-scale dynamically similar model of the Northrop C-125 airplane was made to determine the ditching characteristics and proper ditching technique for the airplane. Various conditions of damage, landing attitude, flap setting, and speed were investigated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, motion-picture records, and time-history deceleration records. The results of the investigation are presented in table form, photographs, and curves. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a nose-high landing attitude (near 8 deg) with flaps full down. The fixed landing gear will cause the airplane to dive. The fuselage will be damaged and will probably flood rapidly. Longitudinal decelerations will be about 4g and the length of landing run will be about two fuselage lengths. If the main landing gear could be jettisonable or retractable the ditching characteristics would be greatly improved.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Windham, John O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Investigation of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Convair-Liner Airplane

Description: A ditching investigation of a model of the Convair-Liner airplane was made to observe the behavior and determine the safest procedure for making an emergency water landing. The ditching model was designed and constructed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Design information on the airplane was furnished by the Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation. A three-view drawing of the airplane is shown. The investigation was made in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Thompson, William C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of torsional flexibility on the rolling characteristics at supersonic speeds of tapered unswept wings

Description: An analysis is presented of the effect of torsional flexibility on the rolling characteristics at supersonic speeds of tapered unswept wings with partial-span constant-percent-chord ailerons extending inboard from the wing tip. The geometric variables considered are aspect ratio, taper ratio, aileron span, and aileron chord. The shape of the wing-torsional-stiffness curve is assumed and the twisting moment is considered to result solely from the pressure distribution caused by aileron deflection, so that the necessity of using a successive-approximation method is avoided. Because of the complexity of the equations resulting from the analysis, numerical calculations from the equations are presented in a series of figures. A computational form is provided to be used in conjunction with these figures so that calculations can be made without reference to the analysis.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Tucker, Warren A & Nelson, Robert L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effects of variations in Reynolds number between 3.0 x 10sub6 and 25.0 x 10sub6 upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a number of NACA 6-series airfoil sections

Description: Results are presented of an investigation made to determine the two-dimensional lift and drag characteristics of nine NACA 6-series airfoil section at Reynolds numbers of 15.0 x 10sub6, 20.0 x 10sub6, and 25.0 x 10sub6. Also presented are data from NACA Technical Report 824 for the same airfoils at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 x 10sub6, 6.0 x 10sub6, and 9.0 x 10sub6. The airfoils selected represent sections having variations in the airfoil thickness, thickness form, and camber. The characteristics of an airfoil with a split flap were determined in one instance, as was the effect of surface roughness. Qualitative explanations in terms of flow behavior are advanced for the observed types of scale effect.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Loftin, Laurence K, Jr & Bursnall, William J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Elastic and plastic buckling of simply supported solid-core sandwich plates in compression

Description: A solution is presented for the problem of the compressive buckling of simply supported, flat, rectangular, solid-core sandwich plates stressed either in the elastic range or in the plastic range. Charts for the analysis of long sandwich plates are presented for plates having face materials of 24s-t3 aluminum alloy, 76s-t6 alclad aluminum alloy, and stainless steel. A comparison of computed and experimental buckling stresses of square solid-core sandwich plates indicates fair agreement between theory and experiment.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Seide, Paul & Stowell, Elbridge Z
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Equations of Motion of a Rocket

Description: In considering the motion of the rocket, at each instant of time only the state of those material particles which a t that instant are within the control surface passing through the exterior surface of the body of the rocket and the exit section of the nozzle shall be included. In order t o obtain the equations of motion of the rocket, the following procedure is used. An arbitrary but fixed instant of time is considered. A fictitious solid body is denoted by S with mass m, which would be obtained if the rocket at the instant t solidified and ceased giving off particles. The solid body S will not be homogeneous; in some of its parts, it will have the density of a metal and in other parts the density of a gas, and so forth. It shall be assumed that the fictitious solid body S is invariably fixed to the body of the rocket and from the instant t onwards (instant of solidification) moves together with the rocket. The momentum of the body S shall be denoted by Q.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Gantmacher, F. R. & Levin, L. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Equilibrium operating performance of axial-flow turbojet engines by means of idealized analysis

Description: A method of predicting equilibrium operating performance of turbojet engines has been developed, with the assumption of simple model processes for the components. Results of the analysis are plotted in terms of dimensionless parameters comprising critical engine dimensions and over-all operating variables. This investigation was made of an engine in which the ratio of axial inlet-air velocity to compressor-tip velocity is constant, which approximates turbojet engines with axial-flow compressors. Experimental correlation of the theory with data from several existing axial-flow-type engines was good and showed close correlation between calculated and measured performance.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Sanders, John C & Chapin, Edward C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department