National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 47 Matching Results

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Flow coefficients of monosleeve valves

Description: The flow coefficients of the intake and the exhaust ports of a sleeve-valve cylinder were measured by attaching the cylinder to a large tank and measuring the changes in pressure and temperature in the tank that were caused by short periods of air flow through the valve ports. The derivation of the equations on which the flow coefficients are based is given. The distribution of total pressure in the arms of the sleeve-valve intake manifold was measured. The arms are found to have as little as 75 percent of the total pressure within the manifold entrance.
Date: February 8, 1940
Creator: Waldron, C. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of ground effect from tests of a glider in towed flight

Description: Report presents the results of an investigation made to find the effect of ground on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Franklin PS-2 glider. The lift, the drag, and the angle of attack of the glider in towed flight were determined at several heights from 0.14 to 1.19 span lengths and at various speeds for each height. Two wing arrangements were tested: the plain wing, and the wing with a nearly full-span 30-percent-chord split flap deflected 45 degrees. The experimental results for the plain wing were in good agreement with theoretical values calculated by the method of Wieselsberger for both the angle of attack and the drag coefficient at a height of 0.21 span length; Tani's refinements of the theory had a practically negligible effect on the computed values in this case.
Date: April 8, 1940
Creator: Wetmore, J. W. & Turner, L. I., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-tunnel investigation of effect of interference on lateral-stability characteristics of four NACA 23012 wings, an elliptical and a circular fuselage and vertical fins

Description: Report presents the results of a wind-tunnel investigation of the effect of wing-fuselage interference on lateral-stability characteristics made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel on four fuselages and two fins, representing high-wing, low-wing, and midwing monoplanes. The fuselages are of circular and elliptical cross section. The wings have rounded tips and, in plan form, one is rectangular and the three are tapered 3:1 with various amounts of sweep. The rate of change in the coefficients of rolling moment, yawing moment, and lateral force with angle of yaw is given in a form to show the increment caused by wing-fuselage interference for the model with no fin and the effect of wing-fuselage interference on fin effectiveness. Results for the fuselage-fin combination and the wing tested alone are also given.
Date: August 8, 1940
Creator: House, Rufus O. & Wallace, Arthur R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critical Compressive Stress for Flat Rectangular Plates Supported Along All Edges and Elastically Restrained Against Rotation along the Unloaded Edges

Description: A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in flat rectangular plates supported along all edges and, in addition, elastically restrained against rotation along the unloaded edges. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required in the construction of the chart are given.
Date: March 8, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On the Use of Residue Theory for Treating the Subsonic Flow of a Compressible Fluid

Description: "A new mathematical technique, due to Milne-Thomson, is used to obtain an improved form of the method of Poggi for calculating the effect of compressibility on the subsonic flow past an obstacle. By means of this new method, the difficult surface integrals of the original Poggi method can be replaced by line integrals. These line integrals are then solved by the use of residue theory. In this way an equation is obtained giving the second-order effect of compressibility on the velocity of the fluid" (p. 39).
Date: September 8, 1941
Creator: Kaplan, Carl
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Studies of the Horizontal-Tail Loads Experienced by a Fighter Airplane in Abrupt Maneuvers

Description: Field measurements were made on a fighter airplane to determine the approximate magnitude of the horizontal tail loads in accelerated flight. In these flight measurements, pressures at a few points were used as an index of the tail loads by correlating these pressures with complete pressure-distribution data obtained in the NACA full-scale tunnel. In addition, strain gages and motion pictures of tail deflections were used to explore the general nature and order of magnitude of fluctuating tail loads in accelerated stalls.
Date: May 8, 1944
Creator: Flight Research Maneuvers Section
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critical combinations of shear and transverse direct stress for an infinitely long flat plate with edges elastically restrained against rotation

Description: An exact solution and a closely concurring approximate energy solution are given for the buckling of an infinitely long flat plate under combined shear and transverse direct stress with edges elastically restrained against rotation. It was found that an appreciable fraction of the critical stress in pure shear may be applied to the plate without any reduction in the transverse compressive stress necessary to produce buckling. An interaction formula in general use was shown to be decidedly conservative for the range in which it is supposed to apply.
Date: November 8, 1944
Creator: Batdorf, S. B. & Houbolt, John C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of air valves for intermittent-jet engines at speeds of 20 and 25 cycles per second

Description: Report discussing a study of automatic nonreturn air valves for use in an intermittent-jet engine. Four valve-spring materials, three valve-grill materials, and five types of valves were used. Valve A, which was made out of aluminum, was found to perform the best and last the longest.
Date: May 8, 1945
Creator: Bressman, Joseph R. & McCready, Robert J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The development and application of high-critical-speed nose inlets

Description: From Summary: "An analysis of the nose-inlet shapes developed in previous investigations to represent the optimum from the standpoint of critical speed has shown that marked similarity exists between the nondimensional profiles of inlets which have widely different proportions and critical speeds. With the nondimensional similarity of such profiles established, the large differences in the critical speeds of these nose inlets must be a function of their proportions. An investigation was undertaken in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel to establish the effects of nose-inlet proportions on critical Mach number to develop a rational method for the design of high-critical-speed nose inlets to meet desired requirements."
Date: June 8, 1945
Creator: Baals, Donald D.; Smith, Norman F. & Wright, John B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight and Test-Stand Investigation of High-Performance Fuels in Pratt & Whitney R-1830-94 Engines 4: Comparison of Cooling Characteristics of Flight and Test-Stand Engines

Description: "The cooling characteristics of three R-1830-94 engines, two of which were mounted in a test stand and the other in a B-24D airplane, were investigated and the results were compared. The flight tests were made at a pressure altitude of 7000 feet; the test-stand runs were made at ground-level atmospheric conditions. Three cooling runs were made for each engine: variable cooling-air pressure drop, variable carburetor-air flow, and variable fuel-air ratio" (p. 1).
Date: October 8, 1946
Creator: Dandois, Marcel & Werner, Milton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Stability of the Jettisonable Nose Section of the X-3 Airplane

Description: "Because previous work has indicated that jettisonable nose sections of airplanes may be inherently unstable, and thus may cause dangerous centripetal accelerations on a pilot after jettisoning during high-speed flight, an investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the behavior in descent of a model of the jettisonable nose section of the Douglas X-3 airplane. The effects of varying the center-of-gravity position, of attaching fins of various sizes, and of installing a stabilizing parachute were investigated. In the investigation the model descended with its front and trimmed 36 deg above the horizontal and rotated about a vertical wind axis while rolling about its longitudinal body axis" (p. 1).
Date: December 8, 1946
Creator: Scher, Stanley H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceleration Characteristics of R-3350 Engine Equipped with NACA Injection Impeller

Description: From Summary: "Qualitative investigations have shown that use of the NACA injection impeller with the R-3350 engine increases the inertia of the fuel-injection system and, when the standard fuel-metering system is used, this increase in inertia results in poor engine acceleration characteristics. This investigation was therefore undertaken to determine whether satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine equipped with the injection impeller could be obtained by simple modifications to the fuel-monitoring system. The engine was operated with two types of carburetor; namely, a hydraulic-metering carburetor incorporating a vacuum-operated accelerating pump and a direct-metering carburetor having a throttle-actuated accelerating pump."
Date: January 8, 1947
Creator: Hickel, Robert O. & Snider, William E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines. II - Analysis of Turbine Performance of the 19B-8 Engine

Description: Performance characteristics of the turbine in the 19B-8 jet propulsion engine were determined from an investigation of the complete engine in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The investigation covered a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and flight Mach numbers from 0.05 to 0.46 for various tail-cone positions over the entire operable range of engine speeds. The characteristics of the turbine are presented as functions of the total-pressure ratio across the turbine and the turbine speed and the gas flow corrected to NACA standard atmospheric conditions at sea level. The effect of changes in altitude, flight Mach number, and tail-cone position on turbine performance is discussed. The turbine efficiency with the tail cone in varied from a maximum of 80.5 percent to minimum of 75 percent over a range of engine speeds from 7500 to 17,500 rpm at a flight Mach number of 0.055. Turbine efficiency was unaffected by changes in altitude up to 15,000 feet but was a function of tail-cone position and flight Mach number. Decreasing the tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area 21 percent reduced the turbine efficiency between 2 and 4.5 percent. The turbine efficiency increased between 1.5 and 3 percent as the flight Mach number changed from 0.055 to 0.297.
Date: January 8, 1947
Creator: Krebs, Richard P. & Suozzi, Frank L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air-Stream Surveys in the Vicinity of the Tail of a 1/8.33-Scale Powered Model of the Republic XF-12 Airplane

Description: "The XF-12 airplane was designed by Republic Aviation Corporation to provide the Army Air Forces with a high performance, photo reconnaissance aircraft. A series of air-stream surveys were made n the vicinity of the empennage of a 1/8.33-scale powered model of the XF-12 airplane in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel. Surveys of the vortical-tail region were made through a range of yaw angles of plus or minus 20 degrees at a high and low angle of attack" (p. 1).
Date: April 8, 1947
Creator: Foster, Gerald V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparative drag measurements at transonic speeds of 6-percent-thick airfoils of symmetrical double-wedge and circular-arc sections from tests by the NACA wing-flow method

Description: Report presenting comparative drag measurements at zero lift at transonic speeds for two sharp-leading-edge airfoils using the NACA wing-flow method. One airfoil had a symmetrical circular-arc section and one had a symmetrical double-wedge section. The primary difference in the drag characteristics of the two airfoils at zero lift is the earlier drag rise of the double-wedge section.
Date: April 8, 1947
Creator: Silsby, Norman S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drag measurements of a swept-back wing having inverse taper as determined by flight tests at supersonic speeds

Description: Report discussing the results of flight tests to determine the drag at zero lift of a swept-back wing of inverse taper using an NACA 65-009 airfoil. The data was compared to untapered wings with a similar degree of sweepback. The tapered wing was found to have a lower drag coefficient than the 34-degree swept-back untapered wing but a higher drag coefficient than the 45-degree swept-back untapered wing.
Date: April 8, 1947
Creator: Alexander, Sidney R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Turbine of Mark 25 Torpedo Power Plant with Five Nozzle Designs

Description: Efficiency investigations were made on the two-stage turbine from a Mark 25 aerial torpedo to determine the performance of the unit with five different turbine nozzles. The output of the turbine blades was computed by analyzing the windage and mechanical-friction losses of the unit. A method was developed for measuring the change in turbine clearances with changed operating conditions. The turbine was found to be most efficient with a cast nozzle having a sharp-edged inlet to the nine nozzle ports.
Date: October 8, 1947
Creator: Hoyt, Jack W. & Kottas, Harry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of the transonic drag characteristics of two wing-body combinations differing only in the location of the 45 degree sweptback wing

Description: Report presenting the drag of a series of wing-body combinations by the free-fall method in order to provide information on the drag characteristics of promising transonic and supersonic airplane arrangements. Time histories, Mach number variations, and drag coefficients for several areas of the body are provided.
Date: December 8, 1947
Creator: Mathews, Charles W. & Thompson, Jim Rogers
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms July 12, 1947 to July 18, 1947 at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio

Description: The gust and draft velocities from records of NACA instruments installed in P-61c airplanes participating in thunderstorm flights at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio, from July 12, to July 18, 1947 are presented.
Date: December 8, 1947
Creator: Funk, Jack
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms September 10, 1947 to September 15, 1947 at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio

Description: The gust and draft velocities from records of NACA instruments installed in P-61C airplanes participating in thunderstorm flights at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio, from September 10, 1947 to September 15, 1947, are presented.
Date: April 8, 1948
Creator: Funk, Jack
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ice protection of turbojet engines by inertia separation of water 2: single-offset-duct system

Description: Investigation of a single-offset-duct system designed to prevent entrance of water into a turbojet engine was conducted on a half-scale nacelle model. An investigation was made to determine ram-pressure recovery and radial velocity profiles at the compressor section and icing characteristics of such a duct system. At a design inlet velocity of 0.77, the maximum ram-pressure recovery attained with effective water-separating inlet was 77 percent, which is considerably less than attainable with a direct-ram inlet. Continuous heating of the accessory-housing surface would be required for inlets that have a small ice storage space.
Date: June 8, 1948
Creator: von Glahn, Uwe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ice protection of turbojet engines by inertia separation of water 3: annular submerged inlets

Description: Aerodynamic and icing studies were conducted on a one-half-scale model of an annular submerged inlet for use with axial-flow turbojet engines. Pressure recoveries, screen radial-velocity profiles, circumferential mass-flow variations, and icing characteristics were determined at the compressor inlet. In order to be effective in maintaining water-free induction air, the inlet gap must be extremely small and ram-pressure recoveries consequently are low, the highest achieved being 65 percent at inlet-velocity ratio of 0.86. All inlets exhibited considerable screen icing. Severe mass-flow shifts occurred at angles of attack.
Date: June 8, 1948
Creator: von Glahn, Uwe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department