National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 735 Matching Results

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Flight Comparison of Performance and Cooling Characteristics of Exhaust-Ejector Installation with Exhaust-Collector-Ring Installation

Description: Flight and ground investigations have been made to compare an exhaust-ejector installation with a standard exhaust-collector-ring installation on air-cooled aircraft engines in a twin-engine airplane. The ground investigation allowed that, whereas the standard engine would have overheated above 600 horsepower, the engine with exhaust ejectors cooled at take-off operating conditions at zero ram. The exhaust ejectors provided as much cooling with cowl flaps closed as the conventional cowl flaps induced when full open at low airspeeds. The propulsive thrust of the exhaust-ejector installation was calculated to be slightly less than the thrust of the collector-ring-installation.
Date: February 14, 1947
Creator: Acker, Loren W. & Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigations of Compression Shocks and Boundary Layers in Gases Moving at High Speed

Description: The mutual influences of compression shocks and friction boundary layers were investigated by means of high speed wind tunnels.Schlieren optics provided a clear picture of the flow phenomena and were used for determining the location of the compression shocks, measurement of shock angles, and also for Mach angles. Pressure measurement and humidity measurements were also taken into consideration.Results along with a mathematical model are described.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Ackeret, J.; Feldmann, F. & Rott, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of a Horizontal-Tail Model through the Transonic Speed Range by the NACA Wing-Flow Method

Description: A 1/12-scale model of a horizontal tail of a fighter airplane was tested through the transonic speeds in the high-speed flow over an airplane wing, the surface of which served as a reflection plane for the model. Measurements of lift, elevator-hinge moment, angle of attack, and elevator angle were made in the Mach number range from 0.75 to 1.04 for elevator deflections ranging from 10 degrees to minus 10 degrees, and for angles of attack of minus 1.2 degrees, 0.4 degrees, and 3.4 degrees. The equipment used to measure the hinge moments of the model proved to be unsatisfactory, and for this reason the hinge-moment data are considered to be only qualitative.
Date: April 11, 1947
Creator: Adams, Richard E. & Silsby, Norman S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of Tests to Determine the Effect of a Conical Windshield on the Drag of a Bluff Body at Supersonic Speeds

Description: Tests to evaluate the effect of a conical windshield on the drag of a bluff body at supersonic speeds were performed for the following configurations: a sharp nose fuselage with stabilizing fins,a blunt nose fuselage with a hemispherical shape, and a blunt nose fuselage with a conical point. Results of the drag coeeficient are described at Mach 1.0 and the greatest Mach number of 1.37.
Date: January 14, 1947
Creator: Alexander, Sidney R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Tests to Determine the Effect of Length of a Conical Windshield on the Drag of a Bluff Body at Supersonic Speeds

Description: Flight tests were conducted to determine the effect of length of a conical windshield on the drag of a bluff body moving at supersonic speeds. A comparison is made between results obtained and results of previous drag tests of body-windshield combinations.The effect of increasing the length of the windshield is discussed.
Date: January 29, 1947
Creator: Alexander, Sidney R. & Katz, Ellis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind Tunnel Development of Means to Alleviate Buffeting of the North American XP-82 Airplane at High Speeds

Description: This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests of a 0.22-scale model of the North American XP-82 airplane with several modifications designed to reduce the buffeting of the airplane. The effects of various modifications on the air flow over the model are shown by means of photographs of tufts. The drag, lift, and pitching-moment coefficients of the model with several of the modifications are shown. The result indicate that, by reflexing the trailing edge of the center section of the wing and modifying the radiator air-scoop gutter and the inboard lower-surface wing fillets, the start of buffeting can be delayed from a Mach number of 0.70 to 0.775, and that the diving tendency of the airplane would be eliminated up to a Mach number of 0.80.
Date: January 9, 1947
Creator: Anderson, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Measurements of the Flying Qualities of a Lockheed P-80A Airplane (Army No. 44-85099): Lateral- and Directional-Stability and Control Characteristics

Description: This report contains the flight-test results of the lateral and directional-stability and control phase (including tests with wing-tip tanks) of a general flying-qualities investigation of the Lockheed P-80A airplane (Army No. 44-85099). These tests were conducted at indicated airspeeds up to 494 miles per hour (0.691 Mach number) at low altitude and up to 378 miles per hour (0.816 Mach number) at high altitude. These tests showed that the flying qualities of the airplane were for the most part in accordance with the requirements of the Army Air Forces Stability and Control Specifications. The only major deficiency noted was the negative lateral stability with the wing-tip tanks installed.
Date: October 24, 1947
Creator: Anderson, Seth B. & Cooper, George E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Measurements of the Flying Qualities of a Lockheed P-80A Airplane (Army No. 44-85099) - Stalling Characteristics

Description: This report contains the flight-test results of the stalling characteristics measured during the flying-qualities investigation of the Lockheed P-8OA airplane (Army No. 44-85099). The tests were conducted in straight and turning flight with and without wing-tip tanks. These tests showed satisfactory stalling characteristics and adequate stall warning for all configurations and conditions tested.
Date: December 4, 1947
Creator: Anderson, Seth B. & Cooper, George E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Measurements of the Flying Qualities of a Lockheed P-80A Airplane (Army No. 44-85099): Longitudinal-Stability and -Control Characteristics

Description: This report contains the flight-test results of the longitudinal-stability and -control phase of a general flying qualities investigation of the Lockheed P-80A airplane (Army No. 44-85099). The tests were conducted at indicated airspeeds up to 530 miles per hour (0.76 Mach number) at low altitude and up to 350 miles per hour (0.82) Mach number) at high altitude. These tests showed that the flying qualities of the airplane were in accordance with the requirements of the Army Air Forces Stability and Control Specification except for excessive elevator control forces in maneuvering flight and the inadequacy of the longitudinal trimming control at low airspeeds.
Date: July 1, 1947
Creator: Anderson, Seth B.; Christofferson, Frank E. & Clousing, Lawrence A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Tests in the Supersonic Sphere

Description: This report presents preliminary data obtained in the Langley supersonic sphere. The supersonic sphere is essentially a whirling mechanism enclosed in a steel shell which can be filled with either air or Freon gas. The test models for two-dimensional study are of propeller form having the same plan form and diameter but varying only in the airfoil shape and thickness ratio. Torque coefficients for the 16-006, 65-110, and the 15 percent thick ellipse models are presented, as well as pressure distributions on a circular-arc supersonic airfoil section having a maximum thickness of 10 percent chord at the 1/3-chord position. Torque coefficients were measured in both Freon and air on the 15 percent thick ellipse, and the data obtained in air and Freon are found to be in close agreement. The torque coefficients for the three previously mentioned models showed large differences in magnitude at tip Mach numbers above 1, the model with the thickest airfoil section having the largest torque coefficient. Pressure distribution on the previously mentioned circular-arc airfoil section are presented at Mach numbers of 0.69, 1.26, and 1.42. At Mach numbers of 1.26 and 1.42 the test section is in the mixed flow region where both subsonic and supersonic speeds occur on the airfoil. No adequate theory has been developed for this condition of mixed flow, but the experimental data have been compared with values of pressure based on Ackeret's theory. The experimental data obtained at a Mach number of 1.26 on the rear portion of the airfoil section agree fairly well with the values calculated by Ackeret's theory. At a Mach number of 1.42 a larger percentage of the airfoil is in supersonic flow, and the experimental data for the entire airfoil agree fairly well with the values obtained using Ackeret's theory.
Date: January 20, 1947
Creator: Baker, John E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department