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Preliminary report on the problem of the atmosphere in relation to aeronautics

Description: A report to the Weather Bureau, Washington DC, from the chairman of the Subcommittee on the Atmosphere in Relation to Aeronautics describing the activities accomplished and the proposal of work to be undertaken by the subcommittee.
Date: January 1, 1917
Creator: Marvin, Charles F
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability of the parachute and helicopter

Description: This report deals with an extension of the theory of stability in oscillation to the case of aircraft following a vertical trajectory, and particularly to the oscillations of parachutes.
Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: Batemen, H
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Kiln Drying of Wood for Airplanes

Description: This report is descriptive of various methods used in the kiln drying of woods for airplanes and gives the results of physical tests on different types of woods after being dried by the various kiln-drying methods.
Date: January 1, 1919
Creator: Tiemann, Harry D
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplies and production of aircraft woods

Description: The purpose of this report is to present in brief form such information as is available regarding the supplies of the kinds of wood that have been used or seem likely to become important in the construction of airplanes, and the amount of lumber of each species normally put on the market each year. A general statement is given of the uses to which each kind of wood is or may be put.
Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: Sparhawk, W N
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Lagrangian Multiplier Method of Finding Upper and Lower Limits to Critical Stresses of Clamped Plates

Description: The theory of Lagrangian multipliers is applied to the problem of finding both upper and lower limits to the true compressive buckling stress of a clamped rectangular plate. The upper and lower limits thus bracket the truss, which cannot be exactly found by the differential-equation approach. The procedure for obtaining the upper limit, which is believed to be new, presents certain advantages over the classical Raleigh-Rite method of finding upper limits. The theory of the lower-limit procedure has been given by Trefftz but, in the present application, the method differs from that of Trefftz in a way that makes it inherently more quickly convergent. It is expected that in other buckling problems and in some vibration problems problems the Lagrangian multiplier method finding upper and lower limits may be advantageously applied to the calculation of buckling stresses and natural frequencies.
Date: January 1, 1946
Creator: Hu, Pai C. & Budiansky, Bernard
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Theoretical Investigation of Longitudinal Stability of Airplanes with Free Controls Including Effect of Friction in Control System

Description: The relation between the elevator hinge moment parameters and the control forces for changes in forward speed and in maneuvers is shown for several values of static stability and elevator mass balance. The stability of the short period oscillations is shown as a series of boundaries giving the limits of the stable regions in terms of the elevator hinge moment parameters. The effects of static stability, elevator moment of inertia, elevator mass unbalance, and airplane density are also considered. Dynamic instability is likely to occur if there is mass unbalance of the elevator control system combined with a small restoring tendency (high aerodynamic balance). This instability can be prevented by a rearrangement of the unbalancing weights which, however, involves an increase of the amount of weight necessary. It can also be prevented by the addition of viscous friction to the elevator control system provided the airplane center of gravity is not behind a certain critical position. For high values of the density parameter, which correspond to high altitudes of flight, the addition of moderate amounts of viscous friction may be destabilizing even when the airplane is statically stable. In this case, increasing the viscous friction makes the oscillation stable again. The condition in which viscous friction causes dynamic instability of a statically stable airplane is limited to a definite range of hinge moment parameters. It is shown that, when viscous friction causes increasing oscillations, solid friction will produce steady oscillations having an amplitude proportional to the amount of friction.
Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Greenberg, Harry & Sternfield, Leonard
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Principal Effects of Axial Load on Moment-Distribution Analysis of Rigid Structures

Description: This thesis presents the method of moment distribution modified to include the effect of axial load upon the bending moments. This modification makes it possible to analyze accurately complex structures, such as rigid fuselage trusses, that heretofore had to be analyzed by approximate formulas and empirical rules. The method is simple enough to be practicable even for complex structures, and it gives a means of analysis for continuous beams that is simpler than the extended three-moment equation now in common use. When the effect of axial load is included, it is found that the basic principles of moment distribution remain unchanged, the only difference being that the factors used, instead of being constants for a given member, become functions of the axial load. Formulas have been developed for these factors, and curves plotted so that their applications requires no more work than moment distribution without axial load. Simple problems have been included to illustrate the use of the curves.
Date: July 1, 1935
Creator: James, Benjamin Wylie
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplement to Comparison of automatic control systems

Description: This analysis deals with the indirect regulator, wherefrom the behavior of the direct regulator is deduced as a limiting case. The prime mover is looked upon as "independent of the load": a change in the adjusting power (to be applied) for the control link (as, for example, in relation to the adjusting path (eta) with pressure valves or the rudder of vessels) does not modify the actions of the prime mover. Mass forces and friction are discounted; "clearance" also is discounted in the transmission links of the regulator.
Date: August 1941
Creator: Oppelt, W
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The critical velocity of a body towed by a cable from an airplane

Description: It is sufficient to consider only the equations of motion of the towed body whereas those of the cable may be left out of consideration. The result obtained makes it possible to determine which factors affect the critical velocity and what modifications of the instrument are necessary for extending the upper limit of that velocity.
Date: July 1937
Creator: De Haas, T P & Koning, C
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The transformation of heat in an engine

Description: This report presents a thermodynamic basis for rating heat engines. The production of work by a heat engine rests on the operation of supplying heat, under favorable conditions, to a working fluid and then taking it away.
Date: April 1929
Creator: Neumann, Kurt
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Investigation of a Jet-Propulsion System Applicable to Flight

Description: Following a brief history of the NACA investigation of jet-propulsion, a discussion is given of the general investigation and analyses leading to the construction of the jet-propulsion ground-test mock-up. The results of burning experiments and of test measurements designed to allow quantitative flight-performance predictions of the system are presented and correlated with calculations. These calculations are then used to determine the performance of the system on the ground and in the air at various speeds and altitudes under various burning conditions. The application of the system to an experimental airplane is described and some performance predictions for this airplane are made. It was found that the main fire could be restricted to an intense, small, and short annular blue flame burning steadily and under control in the intended combustion space. With these readily obtainable combustion conditions, the combustion chamber the nozzle walls and the surrounding structure could be maintained at normal temperatures. The system investigated was found to be capable of burning one-half the intake air up the fuel rates of 3 pounds per second. Calculations were shown to agree well with experiment. It was concluded that the basic features of the jet-propulsion system investigation in the ground-test mock-up were sufficiently developed to be considered applicable to flight installation. Calculations indicated that an airplane utilizing this jet-propulsion system would have unusual capabilities in the high-speed range above the speeds of conventional aircraft and would, in addition, have moderately long cruising ranges if only the engine were used.
Date: April 1, 1944
Creator: Brown, Clinton E.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of compressibility on two-dimensional tunnel-wall interference for a symmetrical airfoil

Description: Summary: The effective change in the velocity of flow past a wing section, caused by the presence of wind-tunnel walls, is known for potential flow. This theory is extended by investigation of the two-dimensional compressible flow past a thin Rankine Oval. It is shown that for a symmetrical section at zero angle of attack the velocity increment due to the tunnel walls in the incompressible case must be multiplied by the factor 1/1-M^2 to take account of compressibility effects. The Mach number, M, corresponds to conditions in the wind-tunnel test section with the model removed (p. 1.).
Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Nitzberg, Gerald E
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department