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Investigations on the stability, oscillation, and stress conditions of airplanes with tab control. Second partial report : application of the solutions obtained in the first partial report to tab-controlled airplanes.

Description: The first partial report, FB 2000, contained a discussion of the derivation of the equations of motion and their solutions for a tab-controlled airplane; the results obtained there are now to be applied to the longitudinal motion of tab-controlled airplanes. In view of the abundance of structural factors and aerodynamic parameters, a general discussion of the problems is unfeasible. Thus it is demonstrated on the basis of examples what stability, oscillation, and stress conditions are to be expected for tab-controlled airplanes. (author).
Date: September 1, 1949
Creator: Filzek, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic study of a wing-fuselage combination employing a wing swept back 63 degrees : characteristics at a Mach number of 1.53 including effect of small variations of sweep

Description: Measured values of lift, drag, and pitching moment at a Mach number of 1.53 and Reynolds numbers of 0.31, 0.62, and 0.84 million are presented for a wing-fuselage combination having a wing leading-edge sweep angle of 63 degrees, an aspect ratio of 3.42, a taper ratio of 0.25, and an NACA 64A006 section in the stream direction. Data are also presented for sweep angles of 57.0 degrees, 60.4 degrees, 67.0 degrees, and 69.9 degrees. The experimentally determined characteristics were less favorable than indicated by the linear theory but the experimental and theoretical trends with sweep were in good agreement. Boundary-layer-flow tests showed that laminar boundary-layer separation was the primary cause of the differences between experiment and theory.
Date: January 26, 1949
Creator: Madden, Robert T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of screens in wide-angle diffusers

Description: An experimental investigation at low airspeeds was made of the filling effect observed when a screen or similar resistance is placed across a diffuser. The filling effect is found to be real in that screens can prevent separation or restore separated flow in diffusers even of extreme divergence and to depend principally on screen location and pressure-drop coefficient of the screen. Results are given for three different diffusers of circular cross section with a variety of screen arrangements. Effects of single screens and multiple screens are shown. The mechanics of the filling effect is explained, and possible efficiencies are discussed. Results of arrangements of multiple screens in wide-angle diffusers are given to show a possible application to damping screens as used in wind tunnels to reduce turbulence. (author).
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Schubauer, G B & Spangenberg, W G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter

Description: The aerodynamic forces on an oscillating airfoil or airfoil-aileron combination of three independent degrees of freedom have been determined. The problem resolves itself into the solution of certain definite integrals, which have been identified as Bessel functions of the first and second kind and of zero and first order. The theory, being based on potential flow and the Kutta condition, is fundamentally equivalent to the conventional wing-section theory relating to the steady case. The air forces being known, the mechanism of aerodynamic instability has been analyzed in detail. An exact solution, involving potential flow and the adoption of the Kutta condition, has been analyzed in detail. An exact solution, involving potential flow and the adoption of the Kutta condition, has been arrived at. The solution is of a simple form and is expressed by means of an auxiliary parameter K.
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Theodorsen, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of the statistical theory of extreme values to gust-load problems

Description: An analysis is presented which indicates that the statistical theory of extreme values is applicable to the problems of predicting the frequency of encountering the larger gust loads and gust velocities for both specific test conditions as well as commercial transport operations. The extreme-value theory provides an analytic form for the distributions of maximum values of gust load and velocity. Methods of fitting the distribution are given along with a method of estimating the reliability of the predictions. The theory of extreme values is applied to available load data from commercial transport operations. The results indicate that the estimates of the frequency of encountering the larger loads are more consistent with the data and more reliable than those obtained in previous analyses. (author).
Date: July 22, 1949
Creator: Press, Harry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of Single-Stage Turbine of Mark 25 Torpedo Power Plant with Two Special Nozzles, 1, Efficiency with 0.45-inch Rotor Blades

Description: An investigation was made of the first-stage turbine of a Mark 25 torpedo power plant to determine the performance of the unity with two nozzle configurations and a special rotor having 0.45-inch blades instead of the standard length of 0.40 inch. Both nozzles had smaller passages than the nozzles of similar shape that were previously investigated. The performance of the nozzle-blade combinations is evaluated in terms of brake, rotor, and blade efficiency as functions of blade-jet speed ratio for three pressure ratios. Over the range of speeds and pressure ratios investigated, the efficiency with the nozzle having rectangular passages (J) was higher than that with a nozzle having circular passages (K). The difference in blade efficiencies varied from less than 0.010 at the lower blade-jet speed ratios for the three pressure ratios investigated to 0.030 at a pressure ratio of 8 and a blade-jet speed ratio of 0.295. The efficiencies with these tow nozzles were generally lower than those obtained with nozzles previously reported in combination with the 0.45-inch blades.
Date: May 4, 1949
Creator: Schum, Harold J. & Whitney, Waren J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department