National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 127 Matching Results

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The friction of piston rings

Description: The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.
Date: March 1, 1945
Creator: Tischbein, Hans W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiences with flow-direction instruments

Description: The method of recording the direction of flows on the basis of the hydrodynamic zero-point measurement has now reached a certain limit, in spite of the good results achieved. While the available flow-direction devices are accurate enough for many purposes, they are all insufficient for perfectly exact prediction of the flow direction. The next problem will be to achieve a point-by point flow-direction record, whereby the test procedure must be simplified, accelerated, and the degree of accuracy of the test data improved.
Date: March 1, 1941
Creator: Eckert, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The shock-absorbed system of the airplane landing gear

Description: A discussion is given of the behavior of the shock-absorbing system, consisting of elastic struts and tires, under landing, take-off, and taxying conditions, and a general formula derived for obtaining the minimum stroke required to satisfy the conditions imposed on the landing gear. Finally, the operation of some typical shock-absorbing systems are examined and the necessity brought out for taking into account, in dynamic landing-gear tests, the effect of the wing lift at the instant of contact with the ground.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Callerio, Pietro
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Minimum Energy Loss Propeller

Description: Various cases are presented of the solution of the problem ot the most efficient propeller, more general cases being considered than the one by Betz in 1919: namely, that of a propeller under a limiting light load, The problem is solved directly and also with the aid of the Ritz method which became readily applicable after the author proposed a method for the solution of the propeller problem, in general, with the aid of trigonometric series. The design of a propeller with the aid of this method is given and an analysis is made of the effect of the fuselage and of the viscosity coefficient mu on the character of the solution of the variational problem.
Date: March 1, 1945
Creator: Poliakhov, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flow Pattern in a Converging-Diverging Nozzle

Description: The present report describes a new method for the prediction of the flow pattern of a gas in the two-dimensional and axially symmetrical case. It is assumed that the expansion of the gas is adiabatic and the flow stationary. The several assumptions necessary of the nozzle shape effect, in general, no essential limitation on the conventional nozzles. The method is applicable throughout the entire speed range; the velocity of sound itself plays no singular part. The principal weight is placed on the treatment of the flow near the throat of a converging-diverging nozzle. For slender nozzles formulas are derived for the calculation of the velocity components as function of the location.
Date: March 1, 1949
Creator: Oswatitsch, K. & Rothstein, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Characteristics Method Applied to Stationary Two-Dimensional and Rotationally Symmetrical Gas Flows

Description: By means of characteristics theory, formulas for the numerical treatment of stationary compressible supersonic flows for the two-dimensional and rotationally symmetrical cases have been obtained from their differential equations.
Date: March 1, 1949
Creator: Pfeiffer, F. & Meyer-Koenig, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure Distribution Measurements at High Speed and Oblique Incidence of Flow

Description: The present report contains the results of a series of observations obtained for a wing of symmetrical profile for different angles of yaw. The shock tunnel with 0.4m x 0.4m cross section, of the Institute for Gas Dynamics at L.F.A. - Braunchweig was available for this work. The profile used was a 9 percent, thick hyperbolic profile with maximum thickness 40 percent aft, which was calculated by the method of F. Ringleb (2). Since the conformal transformation of this profile is known, the theoretical pressure distribution could be determined exactly for the case of incompressible flow. Then by the use of the Prandtl rule one may extend the comparison of theory and experiment to the case of higher velocity of incident flow.
Date: March 1, 1947
Creator: Lippisch, A. & Beuschausen, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Speed Measurements on a Swept-Back Wing (Sweepback Angle phi = 35 Deg)

Description: In the following, high-speed measurements on a swept-back wing are reported. The curves of lift, moment, and drag have been determined up to Mach numbers of M = 0.87, and they are compared to a rectangular wing. Through measurements of the total-head loss behind the wing and through schlieren pictures, an insight into the formation of the compression shock at high Mach numbers has been obtained.
Date: March 1, 1947
Creator: Goethert, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Tests of Two Models of the Army B-36 Airplane

Description: The ditching characteristics of the Army B-36 airplane were determined by testing 1/20- and 1/30-scale dynamic models in calm water in Langley tank no. 2 and at the outdoor catapult. The scope of the tests consisted of ditching the models at various conditions of simulated damage, landing attitudes, and speeds, with various flap settings using several degrees of restraint of the flap hinges. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of deceleration, length of run, and motions of the models. The results showed that the airplane should be ditched at an attitude of about 9 deg with flaps full down. The probable ditching behavior will be a smooth run with a maximum longitudinal deceleration of 3g to 4g and a landing run of 4 to 5 fuselage lengths. Structural failure of the underside of the fuselage will not seriously affect the behavior of the airplane.
Date: March 1, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Cederborg, Gibson A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Force and Pressure-Distribution Measurements on a Rectangular Wing with Double-Hinged Nose

Description: The previous measurements on airfoils with hinged nose disclosed a comparatively large low-pressure peak at the bend of the hinged nose; which favored the separation of flow. It was therefore attempted to reduce these low-pressure peaks by reducing the camber of the forward profile and thereby ensure a longer adherence of the flow and a maximum lift increase. The forces were measured on a rectangular wing with double-hinged nose and end plates, the pressure distributions were measured in the center section of the wing. The measurements disclosed that the highest lift attained with a single-hinged nose cannot be increased by a double-hinged nose. The sum of the deflection angles of both hinged noses related to the maximum lift is about equal to the corresponding angle of the single-hinge nose (approx. 30 deg to 40). The respective angle of attack in both cases amounts to approx. 21 deg. Even the low-pressure peak is about the same in both cases (P/q approx. -5.5). Therefore, a milder curvature of the forward portion of the profile affords no definite increase of the maximum lift.
Date: March 1, 1947
Creator: Lemme, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Theory of a Free Jet of a Compressible Gas

Description: In the present report the theory of free turbulence propagation and the boundary layer theory are developed for a plane-parallel free stream of a compressible fluid. In constructing the theory use was made of the turbulence hypothesis by Taylor (transport of vorticity) which gives best agreement with test results for problems involving heat transfer in free jets.
Date: March 1, 1944
Creator: Abramovich, G. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Method of Determining the Polar Curve of an Airplane in Flight

Description: A fundamental defect of existing methods for the determination of the polar of an airplane in flight is the impossibility of obtaining the thrust or the resistance of the propeller for any type airplane with any type engine. The new method is based on the premise that for zero propeller thrust the mean angle of attack of the blade is approximately the same for all propellers if this angle is reckoned from the aerodynamic chord of the profile section. This angle was determined from flight tests. Knowing the mean angle of the blade setting the angle of attack of the propeller blade at zero thrust can be found and the propeller speed in gliding obtained. The experimental check of the new method carried out on several airplanes gave positive results. The basic assumptions for the construction of the polars and the method of analyzing the flight data are given.
Date: March 1, 1945
Creator: Yegorov, B. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of Counterrotating Propellers

Description: A method for calculation of a counterrotating propeller which is similar to Walchner's method for calculation of the single propeller in the free air stream is developed and compared with measurements. Several dimensions which are important for the design are given end simple formulas for the gain in efficiency derived. Finally a survey of the behavior of the propeller for various operating conditions is presented.
Date: March 1, 1949
Creator: Ginzel, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department