National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 129 Matching Results

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Torsion of flanged members with cross sections restrained against warping

Description: The longitudinal stresses and the stiffness of flange members - I-beams, channels, and Z-bars - were investigated when these members were subjected to torque with constraint against cross-sectional warping. Measured angles of rotation agreed with corresponding calculated values in which the torsion bending factor of the cross section was involved; the agreement was better for the I-beam and the Z-bar than for the channel. Longitudinal stresses measured at the mid-span were found to agree with the calculated values that involved unit warping as well as the torsion-bending factors: the channel showed the greatest discrepancy between measured and calculated values. When commonly given expressions for rotations and maximum longitudinal stresses in a twisted I-beam were applied to the channel and to the Z-bar, values were obtained that were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by the method of torsion-bending constant and unit warping.
Date: March 1, 1943
Creator: Hill, H N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The streamline pattern in the vicinity of an oblique airfoil

Description: A method for determining the streamwise flow pattern of a nonviscous incompressible fluid about an oblique airfoil from the corresponding flow pattern about the airfoil in normal position is presented and illustrated in two examples. The method can be extended to account approximately for compressibility effects by applying the Prandtl-Glauert correction factor to the flow pattern that is normal to the leading edge of the airfoil. The method is expected to be useful in determining the shape of a fuselage or nacelle having a minimum of interference with the flow over a swept-back wing.
Date: March 1, 1947
Creator: Watkins, Charles E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Turbulent flow between rotating cylinders

Description: The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.
Date: March 1, 1943
Creator: Shih-I, Pai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the forces acting on gliders in automobile-pulley-winch and airplane towed flight

Description: The magnitude, the direction, and the fluctuation of towing forces exerted upon gliders by towing them aloft behind an automobile, by means of a winch, and by airplane were measured under a variety of conditions covering a range from gentle to severe types of operation. For these tests the towing forces did not exceed 92 percent of the gross weight of the glider. The results indicate that in pulley and winch towing the towing forces are of about the same magnitude as in automobile towing. Speed increases in the accelerated phases of the towing jerks encountered in airplane towing can readily become critical as speeds in excess of placard speeds can be attained. Passage through the slipstream of the towing airplane can be equivalent to a severe gust that, at high speed, may impose high wing loads and require large control moments.
Date: March 1, 1942
Creator: Klemperer, W B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of the Prevention of Ice on the Airplane Windshield

Description: An investigation of three methods for the prevention and the removal of ice on an airplane windshield has been completed. The methods were: electric heating; hot-air heating; and an alcohol-dispensing, rotating wiper blade. The results showed that vision through the airplane windshield could be maintained during severe icing conditions by the use of heat. When put in operation prior to the formation of ice on the windshield the rotating wiper blade prevented the formation of ice. A combination of heated air and a rotating wiper blade would appear to protect against formation of ice on the windshield exterior, to prevent frost on the interior and to provide for the removal of rainfall.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of downwash and wake characteristics at a Mach number of 1.53 1: rectangular wing

Description: The results of an experimental investigation of the downwash and wake characteristics behind a rectangular plan-form wing of aspect ratio 3.5 are presented. The airfoil section was a 5-percent-thick, symmetrical double wedge. The tests were made at a Mach number of 1.53 and a Reynolds number of 1.25 million. A comparison between experimental and theoretical values of the downwash angles is made.
Date: March 1, 1949
Creator: Perkins, Edward W. & Canning, Thomas N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New method of extrapolation of the resistance of a model planing boat to full size

Description: The previously employed method of extrapolating the total resistance to full size with lambda(exp 3) (model scale) and thereby foregoing a separate appraisal of the frictional resistance, was permissible for large models and floats of normal size. But faced with the ever increasing size of aircraft a reexamination of the problem of extrapolation to full size is called for. A method is described by means of which, on the basis of an analysis of tests on planing surfaces, the variation of the wetted surface over the take-off range is analytically obtained. The friction coefficients are read from Prandtl's curve for turbulent boundary layer with laminar approach. With these two values a correction for friction is obtainable.
Date: March 1, 1942
Creator: Sottorf, W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of knock characteristics in spark-ignition engines

Description: This paper presents a discussion of three potential sources of error in recording engine knocking which are: the natural oscillation of the membrane, the shock process between test contacts, and the danger of burned contacts. Following this discussion, the paper calls attention to various results which make the bouncing-pin indicator appear fundamentally unsuitable for recording knock phenomena.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Schutz, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department