National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 35 Matching Results

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Longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a semispan airplane model with a swept-back tail from tests at transonic speeds by the NACA wing-flow method

Description: Report presenting an investigation using the NACA wing-flow method to determine the longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a semispan airplane model with a wing of conventional plan form and a horizontal tail swept back 45 degrees at transonic speeds. Measurements were made of lift and angle of attack for trim at several stabilizer and elevator settings.
Date: March 28, 1947
Creator: Zalovcik, John A. & Sawyer, Richard H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrodynamic characteristics of aerodynamically refined planing-tail hulls

Description: Report presenting an investigation to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of two aerodynamically refined planing-tail hulls. One hull had an afterbody shaped like a tapered boom and the other had two afterbodies with tapered booms fairing out of engine nacelles. Results regarding take-off stability and trim, landing stability, spray, resistance, directional stability, and static transverse stability are presented.
Date: March 28, 1949
Creator: McKann, Robert & Coffee, Claude W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A torsional stiffness criterion for preventing flutter of wings of supersonic missiles

Description: From Summary: "A formula, based on a semirational analysis, is presented for estimating the torsional stiffness necessary to prevent flutter of a sweptback or unswept uniform wing that attains supersonic speeds. Results of missile flights at speeds up to Mach number 1.4 demonstrate the usefulness of the formula."
Date: August 28, 1947
Creator: Budiansky, Bernard; Kotanchik, Joseph N. & Chiarito, Patrick T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation of two NACA 7-series type airfoils equipped with a slot-lip aileron, trailing-edge frise aileron, and a double slotted flap

Description: Report presenting a wind-tunnel investigation of two NACA 7-series type airfoils, one with 17.7-percent chord thickness and one with 15.4-percent chord thickness, each quipped with a 30-percent-airfoil-chord double slotted flap, a slot-lip aileron, and a trailing-edge Frise aileron with two amounts of overhang balance. Measurements of airfoil lift and drag, Frise aileron hinge moment, and slot-lip aileron hinge moment were obtained through a large range of deflection of flap, Frise aileron, and slot-lip aileron and section angle of attack. Satisfactory lateral control can be obtained by using this combination of airfoils, flaps, and ailerons.
Date: March 28, 1949
Creator: Braslow, Albert L. & Visconti, Fioravante
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theoretical investigation of thrust augmentation of turbojet engines by tail-pipe burning

Description: Report presenting a theoretical analysis of thrust augment of turbojet engines by tail-pipe burning and charts from which the thrust augmentation produced may be evaluated from the normal engine data and performance of the tail-pipe burner. Results regarding general curves and illustrative curves are provided.
Date: January 28, 1947
Creator: Bohanon, H. R. & Wilcox, E. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-tunnel development of optimum double-slotted-flap configurations for seven thin NACA airfoil sections

Description: Report presenting an investigation in the two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnels to develop optimum double-slotted-flap configurations for seven thin NACA airfoil sections. Each was equipped with the same flaps and measured at the same Reynolds numbers. Results regarding the lift characteristics and pitching moment are provided.
Date: April 28, 1947
Creator: Cahill, Jones F. & Racisz, Stanley F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the diborane - hydrogen peroxide propellant combination

Description: Report presenting the results of two runs made with liquid diborane and hydrogen peroxide in a small-scale rocket engine. The first run was very erratic and modifications were made to the testing apparatus and procedures for the second run. In the second run, the combustion started immediately and continued smoothly for 12 seconds of operation.
Date: May 28, 1948
Creator: Rowe, William H.; Ordin, Paul M. & Diehl, John M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of Convergent-Divergent Diffusers at Mach Number 1.85

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Cleveland 18- by 18-inch supersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 1.85 and angles of attack from 0 deg to 5 deg to determine optimum design configurations for a convergent-divergent type of supersonic diffuser with a subsonic diffuser of 5 deg included divergence angle. Total pressure recoveries in excess of theoretical recovery across a normal shock at a free-stream Mach number of 1.85 wore obtained with several configurations.
Date: April 28, 1947
Creator: Wyatt, DeMarquis D. & Hunczak, Henry R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of R-4360-18 Power-Plant Installation for XR60 Airplane, 3, Performance of Induction and Exhaust Systems

Description: From Summary: "A study has been made of the performance of the induction and the exhaust systems on the XR60 power-plant installation as part of an investigation conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. Altitude flight conditions from 5000 to 30,000 feet were simulated for a range of engine powers from 750 to 3000 brake horsepower."
Date: March 28, 1947
Creator: Dupree, David T. & Hawkins, W. Kent
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7-by 10-Foot Tunnel: TED No. DE308, Part 6, Estimated High-Speed Flying Qualities

Description: An analysis of the estimated high-speed flying qualities of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 has been made, based on tests of an 0.08-scale model of this airplane in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel. The analysis indicates longitudinal control-position instability at transonic speeds, but the accompanying trim changes are not large. Control-position maneuvering stability, however, is present for all speeds. Longitudinal lateral control appear adequate, but the damping of the short-period longitudinal and lateral oscillations at high altitudes is poor and may require artificial damping.
Date: October 28, 1948
Creator: Donlan, Charles J. & Kuhn, Richard E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane with a VEE Tail

Description: An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the McDonnell XP-88 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-ft free-spinning tunnel. Results of tests with a conventional tail have been previously reported; the results presented herein are for the model with a vee tail installed. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model. In the normal loading were determined. Tests of the model in the long-range loading also were made. The investigation included leading-edge-flap, spin-recovery-parachute, and rudder-pedal-force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for the normal loading. Deflecting the leading-edge flaps improved recoveries. The results indicated that with the external wing tanks installed (long-range loading) recoveries may be poor and, therefore, if a spin is inadvertently entered in this condition the tanks should be jettisoned if recovery does not appear imminent immediately after it is attempted. A 10-foot spin-recovery tail parachute with a towline 40 feet long and a drag coefficient of 0.63 was found to be effective for spin recovery. The rudder pedal force required for spin recovery was indicated to be within the capabilities of the pilot.
Date: November 28, 1947
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Dive Brakes and a Dive-Recovery Flap on a High-Aspect-Ratio Wing in the Langley 8-Foot High-Speed Tunnel

Description: The results of tests made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a solid brake, a slotted brake, and a dive-recovery flap mounted on a high aspect ratio wing at high Mach numbers are presented. The data were obtained in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel for corrected Mach numbers up to 0.940. The results have been analyzed with regard to the suitability of dive-control devices for a proposed high-speed airplane in limiting the airplane terminal Mach number by the use of dive brakes and in achieving favorable dive-recovery characteristics by the use of a dive-recovery flap. The analysis of the results indicated that the slotted brake would limit the proposed airplane terminal Mach number to values below 0.880 for altitudes up to 35,000 feet and a wing loading of 80 pounds per square foot and the dive-recovery flap would produce trim changes required for controlled pull-outs at 25,000 feet for a Mach number range from 0.800 to 0.900. Basic changes in spanwise loading are presented to aid in the evaluation of the wing strength requirements.
Date: August 28, 1946
Creator: Mattson, Axel T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of J-33-A-21 and J-33-A-23 Compressors with and without Water Injection

Description: In an investigation of the J-33-A-21 and the J-33-A-23 compressors with and without water injection, it was discovered that the compressors reacted differently to water injection although they were physically similar. An analysis of the effect of water injection on compressor performance and the consequent effect on matching of the compressor and turbine components in the turbojet engine was made. The analysis of component matching is based on a turbine flow function defined as the product of the equivalent weight flow and the reciprocal of the compressor pressure ratio.
Date: January 28, 1948
Creator: Beede, William L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.
Date: June 28, 1948
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Characteristics of a High-Aspect-Ratio Wing in the Langley 8-Foot High-Speed Tunnel

Description: An investigation of the characteristics of a wing with an aspect ratio of 9.0 and an NACA 65-210 airfoil section has been made at Mach number up to 0.925. The wing tested has a taper ratio of 2.5:1.0, no twist, dihedral, or sweepback, and 20-percent - chord 37.5-percent-semispan plain ailerons. The results showed that serious changes in the normal-force characteristics occurred when the Mach number was increased above 0.74 at angles of attack between 4 deg. and 10 deg. and above 0.80 at 0 deg. angle of attack.Because of small outboard shifts in the lateral center of load, the bending moment at the root for conditions corresponding to a 3g pull-out at an altitude of 35,000 feet increased by approximately 5% when the Much number was increased beyond 0.83 the negative pitching moments for the high angles of attack increased, whereas those for the low angles of attack decreased with a resulting large increase in the negative slope of the pitching-moment curves. A large increase occurred in the values of the drag coefficients for the range of lift coefficients needed for level flight at an altitude of 35,000 feet when the Mach number was increased beyond a value of 0.80. The wakes at a station 2.82 root chords behind the wing quarter-chord line extended approximately a chord above the wing chord line for the angles of attack required to recover from high-speed dives at high Mach numbers.
Date: August 28, 1940
Creator: Whitcomb, Richard T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.5-Scale Model of the Fairchild XSAM-N-2 Lark Missile at High Subsonic Speeds

Description: An investigation was conducted to determine the longitudinal- and lateral-stability characteristics of a 0.5-scale moue1 of the Fairchild Lark missile, The model was tested with 0 deg and with 22.5 deg of roll. Three horizontal wings having NACA 16-009, 16-209, and 64A-209 sections were tested. Pressures were measured on both pointed and blunt noses. The wind-tunnel-test data indicate that rolling the missile 22.5 deg. had no serious effect on the static longitudinal stability. The desired maneuvering acceleration could not be attained with any of the horizontal wings tested, even with the horizontal wing flaps deflected 50 deg. The flaps on the 64A-209 wing (with small trailing-edge angles and flat sides) were effective at all flap deflections, while the flaps on the 16-series wings (with large trailing-edge angles) lost effectiveness at small flap deflections. The data showed that rolling moment existed when the vertical wing flaps were deflected with the model at other than zero angle of attack. A similar rolling moment probably would be found . with the horizontal wing flaps deflected and the model yawed.
Date: September 28, 1949
Creator: Martin, Andrew & Hunter, Harlo A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms July 24, 1946 to August 6, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

Description: The results obtained from gust and draft velocity measurements within thunderstorms for the period July 24, 1946 to August 6, 1946 at Orlando, Florida are presented herein. These data are summarized in tables I and II and are of the type presented in reference 1 for previous flights. In two thunderstorm traverses, indications of ambient-air temperature were obtained from photo-observer records. These data are summarized in table III.
Date: March 28, 1947
Creator: Tolefson, Harold B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spin and Recovery Characteristics of the Northrop XF-89 Airplane

Description: The spin and recovery characteristics of the Northrop XF-89 airplane, as well as the spin-recovery parachute requirements, the control forces that would be encountered in the spin, and the best method for the crew to attempt an emergency escape are presented in this report. The characteristics were mainly estimated rather than determined by model tests because the XF-89 dimensional and mass characteristics were such as to make this airplane similar to several others, models of which have previously been tested. Brief tests were made on an available model of similar design to augment the estimation. The results indicate that the recovery characteristics will be satisfactory for all airplane loadings if recovery is attempted by use of rudder followed by moving the elevator down. The rudder pedal forces will be within the capabilities of the pilot but the elevator stick forces will be beyond the pilot's capabilities unless a trim tab, or a booster is used. A 9.5-foot-diameter flat-type tail parachute or a 5.0-foot-diameter flat-type wing-tip parachute with a drag coefficient of 0.7 will be a satisfactory emergency spin-recovery device for spin demonstrations and if it is necessary for the crew to abandon the spinning airplane, they should leave from the outboard side of the cockpit.
Date: February 28, 1949
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-scale Model of a Canadian Tailless Glider in the Langley Free-flight Tunnel

Description: An investigation of the stability and control characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of a Canadian tailless glider has been conducted in the 10 Langley free-flight tunnel. The glider designated the N.R.L. tailless glider has a straight center section and outboard panels sweptback 43 deg. along the leading edge of the wing. The aspect ratio is 5.83 and the taper ratio is 0.323. From the results of the investigation and on the basis of comparison with higher-scale static tests of the National Research Council of Canada, it is expected that the longitudinal stability of the airplane will be satisfactory with flap up but unsatisfactory near the stall with flap down. The airplane is expected to have unsatisfactory lateral stability and control characteristics in the design configuration with either flap up or flap down. The model flights showed very low damping of the lateral oscillation. Increasing the vertical-tail area improved the lateral stability, and it appeared that a value of the directional-stability parameter C(sub n beta) of at least 0.002 per degree would probably be necessary for satisfactory lateral flying characteristics. A comparison of the calculated dynamic lateral stability characteristics of the N.R.L. tailless glider with those of a conventional-type sweptback airplane having a similar wing plan form and about the same inclination of the principal longitudinal axis of inertia showed that the tailless glider had poorer lateral stability because of the relatively larger radius of gyration in roll and the smaller damping-in-yaw factor C(sub nr).
Date: March 28, 1949
Creator: Johnson, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vibration survey of blades in 19XB axial-flow compressor: 3 - preliminary engine investigation

Description: Strain gages were used to measure blade vibrations possibly causing failure in the 10-stage compressor of the 19XB jet-propulsion engine. The seventh and tenth stages were of great concern as a result of failures experienced by the manufacturer. Strain-gage records were obtained from all stages during acceleration, deceleration, and constant speed runs. Curves are presented herein showing the maximum allowable vibratory stress for a given speed, the change of the damping coefficient with the mounting of a strain gage at the base of the blade, the effect of rotor speed, on blade natural frequency, and the effect of the order of first bending-mode vibration on stress. It was found that for all stages the lower the order of vibration the higher the stress but no destructive vibrations were detected.
Date: January 28, 1948
Creator: Meyer, André J., Jr. & Calvert, Howard F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Analysis of the Full-Floating Journal Bearing

Description: An analysis of the operating characteristics of a full-floating bearing - a bearing in which a floating sleeve is located between the journal and bearing surfaces - is presented together with charts - from which the performance of such bearings may be predicted. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these charts and a limited number of experiments conducted upon a glass full-floating bearing to verify some results of the analysis are reported. The floating sleeve can operate over a wide range of speeds for a given shaft speed, the exact value depending principally upon the ratio of clearances and upon the ratio of radii of the bearing. Lower operating temperatures at high rotative speeds are to be expected by using a full-floating bearing. This lower operating temperature would be obtained at the expense of the load-carrying capacity of the bearing if, for comparison, the clearances remain the same in both bearings. A full-floating bearing having the same load capacity as a conventional journal bearing may be designed if decreased clearances are allowable.
Date: January 28, 1947
Creator: Shaw, M. C. & Nussdorfer, T. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department