National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 736 Matching Results

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Investigation of Effectiveness of Air-Heating a Hollow Steel Propeller for Protection Against Icing. 1: Unpartitioned Blades

Description: An investigation to determine the effectiveness of icing protection afforded by air-heating hollow steel unpartitioned propeller blades has been conducted In the NACA Cleveland icing research tunnel. The propeller used was a production model modified with blade shank and tip openings to permit internal passage of heated air. Blade-surface and heated-air temperatures were obtained and photographic observations of Ice formations were made with variations In icing intensity and heating rate to the blades. For the conditions of Icing to which the propeller was subjected, it was found that adequate ice protection was afforded with a heating rate of 40 1 000 Btu per hour per blade. With less than 40,000 Btu per hour per blade, ice protection failed because of significant ice accretions on the leading edge. The chordwise distribution of heat was unsatisfactory with most of the available heat dissipated well back of the leading edge on both the thrust and camber face's instead of at the leading edge where it was most needed. A low utilization of available heat for icing protection is indicated by a beat-exchanger effectiveness of approximately 47 percent.
Date: May 1, 1948
Creator: Mulholland, Donald R. & Perkins, Porter J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Effectiveness of Air-Heating a Hollow Steel Propeller for Protection Against Icing. 2: 50% Impartitioned Blades

Description: The icing protection afforded an internal air-heated propeller blade by radial partitioning at 50-percent chord to confine the heated air to the forward half of the blade was determined in the NACA Cleveland icing research tunnel. A modified production-model hollow steel propeller, was used for the investigation. Temperatures of the blade surfaces for several heating rates were measured under various tunnel Icing' conditions. Photographic observations of ice formations on blade surfaces and blade heat-exchanger effectiveness were obtained. With 50-percent partitioning of the blades, adequate icing protection at 1050 rpm was obtained with a heating rate of 26,000 Btu per hour per blade at the blade shank using an air temperature of 400 F with a flow rate of 280 pounds per hour per blade, which is one-third less heat than was found necessary for similar Ice protection with unpartitioned blades. The chordwise distribution of the applied heat, as determined by surface temperature measurements, was considered unsatisfactory with much of the heat dissipated well back of the leading edge. Heat-exchanger effectiveness of approximately 56 percent also Indicated poor utilization of available heat. This effectiveness was, however, 9 percent greater than that obtained from unpartitioned blades.
Date: May 1, 1948
Creator: Perkins, Porter J. & Mulholland, Donald R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Effectiveness of Air-Heating a Hollow Steel Propeller for Protection Against Icing. 3: 25% Partitioned Blades

Description: The icing protection obtained from an internally air-heated propeller blade partitioned to confine the heated air forward of 25-percent chord was investigated in the NACA Cleveland icing research tunnel. A production-model hollow steel propeller was modified with an Internal radial partition at 25-percent chord and with shank and tip openings to admit and exhaust the heated air. Temperatures were measured on the blade surfaces and in the heated-air system during tunnel icing conditions. Heat-exchanger effectiveness and photographs of Ice formations on the blades were obtained. Surface temperature measurements indicated that confining the heated air forward of the 25-percent chord gave.a more economical distribution of the applied heat as compared with unpartitioned and 50-percent partitioned blades, by dissipating a greater percentage of the available heat at the leading edge. At a propeller speed of 850 rpm, a heating rate of 7000 Btu per hour per blade at a shank air temperature of 400 F provided adequate Icing protection at ambient-air temperatures of 23 F but not at temperatures as low as 15 F. With the heating rate used, a heat-exchanger effectiveness of 77 percent was obtained as compared to 56 percent for 50-percent partitioned and 47 percent for unpartitioned blades.
Date: May 1, 1948
Creator: Mulholland, Donald R. & Perkins, Porter J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Additional abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Description: From Summary: "About 500 additional references pertaining to hydrodynamic design of seaplanes have been compiled, and the information is presented in the form of abstracts classified under six main headings:GENERAL INFORMATION, HYDROSTATICS, HYDRODYNAMICS, AERODYNAMICS, OPERATION, and RESEARCH. The compilation is an extension of NACA RM No. L6I13, entitled "Abstracts Pertaining to Seaplanes," by Jerold M. Bidwell and Douglas A. King. An author index and a subject index are included."
Date: March 9, 1948
Creator: Bidwell, J. M. & King, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Icing and De-Icing of a Propeller with Internal Electric Blade Heaters

Description: An investigation has been made in the NACA Cleveland icing research tunnel to determine the de-icing effectiveness of an experimental configuration of an Internal electric propeller-blade heater. Two atmospheric Icing conditions and two propeller operating conditions were Investigated, In experiments with unheated blades and with heat applied to the blades both continuously and cyclically. Data are presented to show the effect of propeller speed., ambient air temperature and liquid-water concentration, and the duration of the heat-on and cycle times on the power requirements and de-Icing performance of the blade heaters. The extent of ice-covered area on the blades for various icing ax4 operating conditions has been determined. The largest iced area was obtained at the higher ambient-air temperatures and at low propeller speed. The ohord.wise extent of Icing In practically every case was greater than that covered by blade heaters. Adequate de-icing in the heated area with continuous application of heat was obtained with the power available but a maximum power, input of 1250 watts per blade was insufficient for cyclic de-Icing for the range of conditions investigated. Blade-surface temperature rates of rise of 0.2 to 0.7 F per second were obtained and the minimum cooling period for cyclic de-icing was found to be approximately 2-1/2 times the heating period.
Date: August 1948
Creator: Lewis, James P. & Stevens, Howard C., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of Ice Formations on Airplane Performance in Level Cruising Flight

Description: A flight investigation in natural icing conditions was conducted by the NACA to determine the effect of ice accretion on airplane performance. The maximum loss in propeller efficiency encountered due to ice formation on the propeller blades was 19 percent. During 87 percent of the propeller icing encounters, losses of 10 percent or less were observed. Ice formations on all of the components of the airplane except the propellers during one icing encounter resulted in an increase in parasite drag of the airplane of 81 percent. The control response of the airplane in this condition was marginal.
Date: May 1948
Creator: Preston, G. Merritt & Blackman, Calvin C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA: University Conference on Aerodynamics, A Compilation of the Papers Presented

Description: This document contains reproductions of the technical papers presented at the NACA - University Conference on Aerodynamics held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory on June 21, 22, and 23, 1948. The conference was held in recognition of the difficulties, imposed by security restrictions, in keeping abreast of the rapid advances in aerodynamics. The papers were prepared to review the status of a number of fields of interest, to summarize the more important wartime advances that are no longer classified, and to orient reference material for further study. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the conference so that distribution of them might be prompt. The original presentation and this record are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee?s system of complete and formal reports.
Date: 1948-06-21/1948-06-23
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Shear Lag in a Plywood Sheet-Stringer Combination Used for the Chord Member of a Box Beam

Description: Theoretical and experimental investigations were made of the distribution of strains in a plywood sheet-stringer combination used as the chord member of a box beam acted upon by bending loads. The theoretical solution was obtained with the help of the principle of minimum potential energy and certain simplifying assumptions. Strain measurements were made on a build-up box beam by means of electrical-resistance strain gages connected with strain indicators. A very satisfactory agreement between the theoretical and experimental strains was obtained.
Date: March 1, 1948
Creator: Borsari, Palamede & Yu, Ai-Ting
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The buckling of a column on equally spaced deflectional and rotational springs

Description: A solution is presented for the problem of the buckling of a column on equally spaced deflectional and rotational springs. Useful charts, which relate deflectional spring stiffness, rotational spring stiffness, and buckling load, are given for columns having two, three, four, and infinite number of spans.
Date: March 1, 1948
Creator: Budiansky, Bernard; Seide, Paul & Weinberger, Robert A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department