National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 23 Matching Results

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Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/16-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2349

Description: Spin tests of a 1/16-scale model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 airplane have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effect of control position and movement upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics ae well as the effects of propellers, of stability flaps, and of various revisions to the design configuration have been determined for the normal fighter loading. The investigation also included spin recovery parachute, tumbling, and pilot-escape tests. For the original design configuration, with or without windmilling propellers, the recovery characteristics of the model were considered unsatisfactory. Increasing the maximum upward deflection of the ailavators from 45 deg to 65 deg resulted in greatly improved recovery characteristics. Dimensional revisions to the original airplane configuration, which satisfactorily improved the general spin and recovery characteristics of the model, consisted of: (1) a supplementary vertical tail 34 inches by 59 inches (full-scale) attached to a boom 80 inches aft of the trailing edge of the airplane in the plane of symmetry, (2) a large semispan undersurface spoiler placed along the airplane quarter-chord line and opened on the outboard side in a spin, or (3) two additional vertical tails 64 inches by 52 inches (full-scale) located at the tips of the ailavators. A satisfactory parachute arrangement for emergency spin recovery from demonstration spins was found to be an arrangement consisting of a 13.3-foot parachute attached by a 30-foot towline to the arresting gear mast on the airplane and opened simultaneously with an 8-foot parachute on the outboard end of the wing attached by a 3-foot towline. Tests indicated that pilot escape from a spin would be extremely hazardous unless the pilot is mechanically ejected from the cockpit. Model tumbling tests indicated that the airplane would not tumble.
Date: October 17, 1947
Creator: White, Richard P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane While Attached to the Trapeze

Description: At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation of the low-speed, power-off, stability and control characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The results of the portion of the investigation consisting of tests of a 1/10-scale model to study the stability of the XP-85 when attached to the trapeze and during retraction into the B-36 bomb bay are presented herein. In the power-off condition the stability was satisfactory with all oscillations well damped and the nose-restraining collar could be placed in position without difficulty. In a simulated power-on condition the model had a constant-amplitude rolling and sidewise motion and when the collar was layered, a violent motion resulted if the collar struck the model but failed to hold it in the proper manner. Folding of the wings and retraction into the bomb bay offered no problem once the airplane was properly held by the collar. It is recommended that the power be cut immediately after hooking on and that a restricting mechanism be incorporated in the center of the trapeze to eliminate the sidewise motion. It also appears desirable to have the retracting procedure controlled by the XP-85 pilot or an observer in the mother ship to insure that the parasite is in proper position after hooking up before bringing the collar down.
Date: November 17, 1947
Creator: Johnson, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/20-Scale Model of the McDonnell XF2H-1 Airplane

Description: A spin-recovery investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 20-scale model modified to represent the McDonnell XF2H-1 airplane. The project included tests both with tip tanks installed and with the tanks removed. The results indicated that the recovery characteristics of the airplane would be satisfactory for all loadings by normal recovery technique (full reversal of the rudder, followed 1/2 turn later by movement of the elevator down). The rudder pedal and the elevator stick forces likely to be encountered in a spin should be within the capabilities of the pilot.
Date: June 17, 1949
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

Description: An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. In the investigation it was found that with flaps neutral satisfactory flight behavior at low speeds was obtainable with an increase in height of the vertical tail and with the inboard slats opened. In the flap-down slat-open condition the longitudinal stability was satisfactory, but it was impossible to obtain satisfactory lateral-flight characteristics even with the increase in height of the vertical tail because of the negative effective dihedral, low directional stability, and large-adverse yawing moments of the ailerons.
Date: November 17, 1947
Creator: Bennett, Charles V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the North American XP-86 Airplane

Description: A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the North American XP-86 airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the design gross weight loading. The long-range loading was also investigated and the effects of extending slats and dive flaps were determined. In addition, the investigation included the determination of the size of spin-recovery parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins, the rudder force required to move the rudder for recovery, and the best method for the pilot to escape if it should become necessary to do so during a spin. The results of the investigation indicated that the XP-86 airplane will probably recover satisfactorily from erect and inverted spins for all possible loadings. It was found that fully extending both slats would be beneficial but that extending the dive brakes would cause unsatisfactory recoveries. It was determined that a 10.0-foot-diameter tail parachute with a drag coefficient of 0.7 and with a towline 30.0 feet long attached below the jet exit or a 6.0-foot-diameter wingtip parachute opened on the outer wing tip with a towline 6.0 feet long would insure recoveries from any spins obtainable. The rudder-pedal force necessary to move the rudder for satisfactory recovery was found to be within the physical capabilities of the pilot.
Date: May 17, 1948
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Investigation of a Jet-Propulsion System Applicable to Flight

Description: Following a brief history of the NACA investigation of jet propulsion, a discussion is given of the general investigation and analysis leading to the construction of the jet-propulsion ground-test mock-up. The results of burning experiments and of test measurements designed to allow quantitative flight performance predictions of the system are presented and correlated with calculations. These calculations are then used to determine the performance of the system on the ground and in the air at various speeds and altitudes under various burning conditions. The application of the system to an experimental airplane is described and some performance predictions for this airplane are made.
Date: September 17, 1943
Creator: Ellis, Macon C. & Brown, Clinton E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ram-recovery characteristics of NACA submerged inlets at high subsonic speeds

Description: Results are presented of an experimental investigation of the characteristics of NACA submerged inlets on a model of a fighter airplane for Mach numbers from 0.30 to 0.875. The effects on the ram-recovery ratio at the inlets of Mach number, angle of attack, boundary-layer thickness on the fuselage, inlet location, and boundary-layer deflectors are shown. The data indicate only a slight decrease in ram-recovery ratio for the inlets ahead of or just behind the wing leading edge as Mach number increased, but showed large decreases at high Mach numbers for the inlets aft of the point of maximum thickness of the wing.
Date: November 17, 1948
Creator: Hall, Charles F & Frank, Joseph L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department