National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 1,574 Matching Results

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Investigation of Icing Characteristics of Typical Light Airplane Engine Induction Systems

Description: The icing characteristics of two typical light-airplane engine induction systems were investigated using the carburetors and manifolds of engines in the horsepower ranges from 65 to 85 and 165 to 185. The smaller system consisted of a float-type carburetor with an unheated manifold and the larger system consisted of a single-barrel pressure-type carburetor with an oil-jacketed manifold. Carburetor-air temperature and humidity limits of visible and serious Icing were determined for various engine power conditions. Several.methods of achieving ice-free induction systems are discussed along with estimates of surface heating requirements of the various induct ion-system components. A study was also made of the icing characteristics of a typical light-airplane air scoop with an exposed filter and a modified system that provided a normal ram inlet with the filter located in a position to Induce inertia separation of the free water from the charge air. The principle of operation of float-type carburetors is proved to make them inherently more susceptible to icing at the throttle plate than pressure-type carburetors.. The results indicated that proper jacketing and heating of all parts exposed to the fuel spray can satisfactorily reduce or eliminate icing in the float-type carburetor and the manifold. Pressure-type carburetors can be protected from serious Icing by proper location of the fuel-discharge nozzle combined with suitable application of heat to critical parts.
Date: February 1, 1949
Creator: Coles, W. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Table of interplanar spacings for crystal-structure determinations by X-ray diffraction with molybdenum, copper, cobalt, iron, and chromium radiations

Description: For a simple diffraction pattern, the time required to calculate interplanar distances from measurements of the pattern is not excessive. If more than a few lines are present, however, or if several patterns are to be studied, it is very advantageous to have available a table giving interplanar spacings directly in terms of the linear measurements made on the film of the lines appearing on the diffraction pattern. The preparation of the table given here was undertaken when the expansion of research activities involving X-ray diffraction techniques indicated that such a table would greatly decrease the time required to analyze diffraction patterns. The table was prepared for use with K alpha(sub 1) radiation from the following target materials: molybdenum, copper, cobalt, iron, and chromium.
Date: October 1, 1945
Creator: Kittel, J Howard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of a gust-alleviating wing in the gust tunnel

Description: Tests were made in the NACA gust tunnel to determine the effectiveness of a torsionally flexible wing with the torsion axis ahead of the locus of the section aerodynamic centers in reducing airplane accelerations due to atmospheric gusts. For three gust shapes, a series of flights was made with the airplane model equipped with either a torsionally flexible or a rigid wing. The results indicated that the torsionally flexible wing reduced the maximum acceleration increment 5 percent for the sharp-edge gust and about 17 percent for gust shapes with gradient distances of 6.8 and 15 chord lengths. The analysis indicated that the effectiveness of this method of gust alleviation was independent of the gust velocity and that, for the same total load increment, the torsionally flexible wing would have 10 percent less bending-moment increment at the root section of the wing than a rigid wing in all but the sharpest gusts. The results also indicated that the torsionally flexible wing slightly increased the longitudinal stability of the airplane model in a gust.
Date: April 1, 1941
Creator: Shufflebarger, C C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The column strength of aluminum alloy 75S-T extruded shapes

Description: Because the tensile strength and tensile yield strength of alloy 75S-T are appreciably higher than those of the materials used in the tests leading to the use of the straight-line column curve, it appeared advisable to establish the curve of column strength by test rather than by extrapolation of relations determined empirically in the earlier tests. The object of this investigation was to determine the curve of column strength for extruded aluminum alloy 75S-T. In addition to three extruded shapes, a rolled-and-drawn round rod was included. Specimens of various lengths covering the range of effective slenderness ratios up to about 100 were tested.
Date: January 1, 1946
Creator: Holt, Marshall & Leary, J R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress analysis of columns and beam columns by the photoelastic method

Description: Principles of similarity and other factors in the design of models for photoelastic testing are discussed. Some approximate theoretical equations, useful in the analysis of results obtained from photoelastic tests are derived. Examples of the use of photoelastic techniques and the analysis of results as applied to uniform and tapered beam columns, circular rings, and statically indeterminate frames, are given. It is concluded that this method is an effective tool for the analysis of structures in which column action is present, particularly in tapered beam columns, and in statically indeterminate structures in which the distribution of loads in the structures is influenced by bending moments due to axial loads in one or more members.
Date: March 1, 1946
Creator: Ruffner, B F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department