National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 123 Matching Results

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Aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils IV : continuation of reports nos. 93, 124, and 182

Description: This collection of data on airfoils has been made from the published reports of a number of the leading Aerodynamic Laboratories of this country and Europe. The information which was originally expressed according to the different customs of the several laboratories is here presented in a uniform series of charts and tables suitable for the use of designing engineers and for purposes of general reference. The authority for the results here presented is given as the name of the laboratory at which the experiments were conducted, with the size of the model, wind velocity, and year of test.
Date: September 1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air force and moment for N-20 wing with certain cut-outs

Description: From Introduction: "The airplane designer often finds it necessary, in meeting the requirements of visibility, to remove area or to otherwise locally distort the plan or section of an airplane wing. This report, prepared for the Bureau of Aeronautics January 15, 1925, contains the experimental results of tests on six 5 by 30 inch N-20 wing models, cut out or distorted in different ways, which were conducted in the 8 by 8 foot wind tunnel of the Navy Aerodynamical Laboratory in Washington in 1924. The measured and derived results are given without correction for vl/v for wall effect and for standard air density, p=0.00237 slug per cubic foot."
Date: November 29, 1926
Creator: Smith, R H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The air forces on a model of the sperry messenger airplane without propeller

Description: From Summary: "This is a report on a scale effect research which was made in the variable-density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the request of the Army Air Service. While the present report is of a preliminary nature, the work has progressed far enough to show that the scale effect is almost entirely confined to the drag."
Date: 1926?~
Creator: Munk, Max M. & Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Albatros commercial Airplane L 73

Description: The Albatros was a two engine commercial biplane carrying 2 pilots, eight passengers, and 160 KG of baggage. The framework is metal, the wings having plywood and fabric over the steel tubing. The L 73 was the first 2 engine biplane to be made in Germany.
Date: September 1926
Creator: Ruhl, Karl & Wiederhold, Hasso
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Albert TE-1 training airplane

Description: The TE-1 is designed for the economical training of pilots and is a single seat parasol cantilever monoplane. It is nearly entirely made of wood, using a 40 HP. air-cooled Salmson A.D. 9 engine, and weighs 255 kg empty.
Date: December 1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (11th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 210 to 232

Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Date: January 1, 1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Approximate Calculation of the Static Longitudinal Stability of Airplanes

Description: It seems desirable to have some simple method for calculating quickly and with sufficient accuracy: 1) the correct position of the center of gravity; 2) the requisite tail-group dimensions; 3) and the course of the wing and tail-group moments. In out deductions, we will first replace the biplane (disregarding the effect of stagger, decalage and induced drag) by an equivalent monoplane, whose dimensions and position in space can be approximately determined in a simple manner.
Date: November 1926
Creator: Bienen, Theodor
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Avia pursuit airplane B.H. 21

Description: Built by the 'Czecho-Slovakian' aircraft factory, AVIA, the B.H. 21, has a top speed of 250 MPH, and carries 120 kg of gasoline and 20 kg of oil, giving it a radius of action of 600-650 km. It is equipped with a Hispano-Suiza engine capable of 300 HP.
Date: November 1926
Creator: Serryer, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Avro "Avian" Airplane : 65 HP. Armstrong-Siddeley "Genet" engine

Description: The Avro Avian, designed by Mr. Chadwick of A.V. Roe & Co., Ltd. has a very low structural weight (estimated at 750 lbs. empty) but with sufficient structural integrity to be eligible of an "Aerobatics" certificate from the British Air Ministry. It can be configured as a monoplane, or a biplane with seaplane floats. It is designed for economical production.
Date: October 1, 1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Behm acoustic sounder for aircraft

Description: The Behm acoustic sounder for aircraft enables the barometric determination for the altitude by night or fog and therefore promises to prove of great importance in safeguarding air traffic.
Date: January 1, 1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Bristol "Badminton" Airplane

Description: The Bristol Badminton, Type 99 airplane has a radial aircooled engine (a Bristol Jupiter 9 cylinder 450 HP.) and three fuel tanks. It is a single seat biplane weighing 1,840 lbs. empty and 2,460 lbs. loaded.
Date: October 1, 1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of tubular radiators of the automobile type

Description: We propose to show how to calculate the cooling capacity of all radiators through which the air flows in separate treamlets, whether enclosed in actual tubes or not and whatever cross-sectional shape the tubes may have. The first part will give the fundamental principles for calculating velocity of air in the tubes and the heat exchange by radiation, conduction and convection, and show, by examples, the agreement of the calculation with experiments. In the second part, the effect of the dimensions and conditions of operation on the heat exchange will be systematically investigated.
Date: January 1, 1926
Creator: Richter, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Change of 180 degrees in the direction of a uniform current of air

Description: In the construction of aerodynamic tunnels, it is a very important matter to obtain a uniform current of air in the sections where measurements are to be made. The straight type ordinarily used for attaining a uniform current and generally recommended for use, has great defects. If we desire to avoid these defects, it is well to give the canals of the tunnel such a form that the current, after the change of direction of its asymptotes, approximates a uniform and rectilinear movement. But for this, the condition must be met that at no place does the flow exceed the maximum velocity assumed, equal to the velocity in the straight parts of the canal.
Date: February 1, 1926
Creator: Witoszynski, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characteristics of a boat type seaplane during take-off

Description: This report, on the planing and get-away characteristics of the F-5-L, gives the results of the second of a series of take-off tests on three different seaplanes conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the suggestion of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department. The single-float seaplane was the first tested and the twin-float seaplane is to be the third. The characteristics of the boat type were found to be similar to the single float, the main difference being the increased sluggishness and relatively larger planing resistance of the larger seaplane. At a water speed of 15 miles per hour the seaplane trims aft to about 12 degrees and remains in this angular position while plowing. At 2.25 miles per hour the planing stage is started and the planing angle is immediately lowered to about 10 degrees. As the velocity increases the longitudinal control becomes more effective but over control will produce instability. At the get-away the range of angle of attack is 19 degrees to 11 degrees with velocities from the stalling speed through about 25 per cent of the speed range.
Date: January 1926
Creator: Crowley, J. W. & Ronan, K. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department