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Lift and drag effects of wing-tip rake

Description: This report deals with a description and report of tests carried out at the Washington Navy Yard on models of the RAF-6, albatross and Slone airfoils to determine the effectiveness of the conventional wing-trailing edge being always longer than the leading edge. The results are compared with the values computed by standard formulae in use at the time the tests were conducted.
Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Zahm, A. F.; Bear, R. M. & Hill, G. C.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The drag of C class airship hull with varying length of cylindric midships

Description: A model of the C class airship hull, when severed at its major section and provided with a cylindric mid-body of variable length, had its air resistance increased about in proportion to the length of the mid-body up to 3 diameters, and in about the manner to be expected from the increase of skin friction on this variable length. For greater length the drag increased less and less rapidly.
Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Zahm, A. F.; Smith, R. H. & Hill, G. C.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cooperative investigation of relationship between static and fatigue properties of wrought n-155 alloy at elevated temperatures

Description: Report presents the correlation of extensive data obtained relating properties of wrought n-155 alloy under static, combined static and dynamic, and complete reversed dynamic stress conditions. Time period for fracture ranged from 50 to 500 hours at room temperature, 1,000 degrees, 1,200 degrees, and 1,500 degrees F.
Date: January 1, 1956
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The design of low-turbulence wind tunnels

Description: Within the past 10 years there have been placed in operation in the United States four low-turbulence wind tunnels of moderate cross-sectional area and speed, one at the National Bureau of Standards, two at the NACA Langley Laboratory, and one at the NACA Ames Laboratory. This paper reviews briefly the state of knowledge and those features which make possible the attainment of low turbulence in wind tunnels. Specific applications to two wind tunnels are described.
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Dryden, Hugh L & Abbott, Ira H
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The zero-lift drag of a slender body of revolution (NACA RM-10 research model) as determined from tests in several wind tunnels and in flight at supersonic speeds

Description: The results of tests of a slender body of revolution designated the NACA rm-10 have been compiled from various NACA test facilities. Zero-lift drag data are presented for a Reynolds number range from about 1 x 10(6) to 40 x 10(6) from several wind tunnels and from about 12 x 10(6) to 140 x 10(6) from free-flight tests. The Mach numbers covered include 1.5 to 2.4 for the wind-tunnel data and 0.85 to 2.5 for the flight results. The wind tunnel models were tested with and without 60 degree sweptback stabilizing fins and the flight models were tested with stabilizing fins. Comparison of the data obtained in the several wind tunnels for the body alone (without fins) shows good agreement between the different facilities. There are unexplained differences however between the wind-tunnel results with fins attached and flight results, as well as differences between full-scale and half-scale flight models, which cannot be explained as an effect of Reynolds number.
Date: January 1, 1954
Creator: Evans, Albert J
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.
Date: January 1, 1924
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-tunnel tests of 10-foot-diameter autogiro rotors

Description: Report presents the results of a series of 10-foot-diameter autogiro rotor models tested in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel. Four of the models differed only in the airfoil sections of the blades, the sections used being the NACA 0012, 0018, 4412, and 4418. Three additional models employing the NACA 0012 section were tested, in which a varying portion of the blade near the hub was replaced by a streamline tube with a chord of about one-fourth the blade chord.
Date: January 1, 1937
Creator: Wheatley, John B & Bioletti, Carlton
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Present status of aircraft instruments

Description: This report gives a brief description of the present state of development and of the performance characteristics of instruments included in the following group: speed instruments, altitude instruments, navigation instruments, power-plant instruments, oxygen instruments, instruments for aerial photography, fog-flying instruments, general problems, summary of instrument and research problems. The items considered under performance include sensitivity, scale errors, effects of temperature and pressure, effects of acceleration and vibration, time lag, damping, leaks, elastic defects, and friction.
Date: January 1, 1932
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A resume of the advances in theoretical aeronautics made by Max M. Munk

Description: In order to apply profitably the mathematical methods of hydrodynamics to aeronautical problems, it is necessary to make simplifications in the physical conditions of the latter. To begin with, it is allowable in many problems, as Prandtl has so successfully shown, to treat the air as having constant density and as free of viscosity. But this is not sufficient. It is also necessary to specify certain shapes for the solid bodies whose motion through the air is discussed, shapes suggested by the actual solids - airships or airfoils - it is true, but so chosen that they lead to solvable problems. In a valuable paper presented by Dr. Max M. Munk, of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Washington, to the Delft Conference in April, 1924, these necessary simplifying assumptions are discussed in detail. It is the purpose of the present paper to present in as simple a manner as possible some of the interesting results obtained by Dr. Munk's methods.
Date: January 1, 1926
Creator: Ames, Joseph S
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author).
Date: January 1, 1923
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interference tests on NACA pitot tubes

Description: In connection with the standardization of instruments used in the wind tunnel, this investigation was undertaken to determine the nature and magnitude of the errors inherent in the measurement of air speed by a pitot tube when the instrument is mounted close to some other body. The mounting of the instrument in proximity to some other body is so frequent in flight and in wind tunnel research that it seemed advisable to investigate thoroughly the magnitude of the possible errors caused by such proximity. The results of this investigation will facilitate comparisons of the errors due to interference which have been reduced to percentages of the air-speed readings obtained under conditions of no interference.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air forces and moments on triangular and related wings with subsonic leading edges oscillating in supersonic potential flow

Description: This analysis treats the air forces and moments in supersonic potential flow on oscillating triangular wings and a series of sweptback and arrow wings with subsonic leading edges and supersonic trailing edges. For the wings undergoing sinusoidal torsional oscillations simultaneously with vertical translations, the linearized velocity potential is derived in the form of a power series in terms of a frequency parameter. This method can be useful for treatment of similar problems for other plan forms and for wings undergoing other sinusoidal motions. For triangular wings, as many terms of such a series expansion as may be derived can be determined; however, the terms after the first few become very cumbersome. Closed expressions that include the reduced frequency to the fifth power, an order which is sufficient for a large class of practical application, are given for the velocity potential and for the components of chordwise section force and moment coefficients. These wings are found to exhibit the possibility of undamped torsional oscillations for certain ranges of Mach number and locations of the axis of rotation. The ranges of these parameters are delineated for triangular wings.
Date: 1952?~
Creator: Watkins, Charles E & Berman, Julian N
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air forces, moments and damping on model of fleet airship Shenandoah

Description: To furnish data for the design of the fleet airship Shenandoah, a model was made and tested in the 8 by 8 foot wind tunnel for wind forces, moments, and damping, under conditions described in this report. The results are given for air of standard density. P=0.00237 slugs per cubic foot with vl/v correction, and with but a brief discussion of the aerodynamic design features of the airship.
Date: 1922~
Creator: Zahm, A F; Smith, R H & Louden, F A
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aeronautic Power Plant Investigations

Description: Report presents the design of radiators, spark plugs and test equipment used to test the performance of aeronautic engines at high altitudes.
Date: May 1, 1917
Creator: Dickinson, H. C.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air conditions close to the ground and the effect on airplane landings

Description: This report presents the results of an investigation undertaken to determine the feasibility of making glide landings in gusty air. Wind velocities were measured at several stations between the ground and a height of 51 feet, and flight tests were made to determine the actual influence of gusts on an airplane gliding close to the ground.
Date: April 3, 1934
Creator: Thompson, F L; Peck, W C & Beard, A P
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air-consumption parameters for automatic mixture control of aircraft engines

Description: Data obtained from Navy calibration tests of an 18-cylinder, two-row, radial engine of 3350-cubic-inch displacement and a 14-cylinder, two-row, radial engine of 2600-cubic-inch displacement (carburetor types) were analyzed to show the correlation between the air consumption of these engines and the parameters that evaluate the air consumption from intake-manifold temperature and pressure, exhaust back pressure, and engine speed.
Date: September 1, 1944
Creator: Shames, Sidney J
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air flow around finned cylinders

Description: Report presents the results of a study made to determine the air-flow characteristics around finned cylinders. Air-flow distribution is given for a smooth cylinder, for a finned cylinder having several fin spacings and fin widths, and for a cylinder with several types of baffle with various entrance and exit shapes. The results of these tests show: that flow characteristics around a cylinder are not so critical to changes in fin width as they are to fin spacing; that the entrance of the baffle has a marked influence on its efficiency; that properly designed baffles increase the air flow over the rear of the cylinder; and that these tests check those of heat-transfer tests in the choice of the best baffle.
Date: November 7, 1935
Creator: Brevoort, M J & Rollin, Vern G
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air flow in a separating laminar boundary layer

Description: The speed distribution in a laminar boundary layer on the surface of an elliptic cylinder, of major and minor axes 11.78 and 3.98 inches, respectively, has been determined by means of a hot-wire anemometer. The direction of the impinging air stream was parallel to the major axis. Special attention was given to the region of separation and to the exact location of the point of separation. An approximate method, developed by K. Pohlhausen for computing the speed distribution, the thickness of the layer, and the point of separation, is described in detail; and speed-distribution curves calculated by this method are presented for comparison with experiment.
Date: December 1, 1934
Creator: Schubauer, G. B.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air flow in the boundary layer near a plate

Description: The published data on the distribution of speed near a thin flat plate with sharp leading edge placed parallel to the flow (skin friction plate) are reviewed and the results of some additional measurements are described. The purpose of the experiments was to study the basic phenomena of boundary-layer flow under simple conditions.
Date: March 1936
Creator: Dryden, Hugh L.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air flow in the boundary layer of an elliptic cylinder

Description: The boundary layer of an elliptic cylinder of major and minor axis 11.78 and 3.98 inches, respectively, was investigated in air stream in which the turbulence could be varied. Conditions were arranged so that the flow was two-dimensional with the major axis of the ellipse parallel to the undisturbed stream. Speed distributions across the boundary layer were determined with a hot-wire anemometer at a number of positions about the surface for the lowest and highest intensities of turbulence, with the air speed in both cases sufficiently high to produce a turbulent boundary layer over the downstream part of the surface. The magnitude and the frequency of the speed fluctuations in the boundary layer were also measured by the use of the conventional type of hot-wire turbulence apparatus. Stream turbulence was found to affect both the nature of transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the layer and the position on the surface at which transition occurred. Transition was then investigated in detail with stream turbulence of several different scales and intensities.
Date: August 6, 1938
Creator: Schubauer, G B
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air flow through poppet valves

Description: Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.
Date: 1918
Creator: Lewis, G W & Nutting, E M
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air force and moment for N-20 wing with certain cut-outs

Description: The airplane designer often finds it necessary, in meeting the requirements of visibility, to remove area or to otherwise locally distort the plan or section of an airplane wing. This report, prepared for the Bureau of Aeronautics January 15, 1925, contains the experimental results of tests on six 5 by 30 inch N-20 wing models, cut out or distorted in different ways, which were conducted in the 8 by 8 foot wind tunnel of the Navy Aerodynamical Laboratory in Washington in 1924. The measured and derived results are given without correction for vl/v for wall effect and for standard air density, p=0.00237 slug per cubic foot.
Date: November 29, 1926
Creator: Smith, R H
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Elements of the Wing Section Theory and of the Wing Theory

Description: Results are presented of the theory of wings and of wing sections which are of immediate practical value. They are proven and demonstrated by the use of the simple conceptions of kinetic energy and momentum only.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Munk, Max M.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department