National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 288 Matching Results

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The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

Description: An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy Fuel Specification, No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs or the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.
Date: October 1, 1943
Creator: Memm, J. Lawrence, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of Airfoil Data

Description: Recent airfoil data for both flight and wind-tunnel tests have been collected and correlated insofar as possible. The flight data consist largely of drag measurements made by the wake-survey method. Most of the data on airfoil section characteristics were obtained in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel. Detail data necessary for the application of NACA 6-serles airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures, together with recent data for the NACA 24-, 44-, and 230-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6- and 7-series airfoils and their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Data and methods are given for rapidly obtaining the approximate pressure distributions for NACA four-digit, five-digit, 6-, and 7-series airfoils. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed. The data indicate that the effects of surface condition on the lift and drag characteristics are at least as large as the effects of the airfoil shape and must be considered in airfoil selection and the prediction of wing characteristics. Airfoils permitting extensive laminar flow, such as the NACA 6-series airfoils, have much lower drag coefficients at high speed and cruising lift coefficients than earlier types-of airfoils if, and only if, the wing surfaces are sufficiently smooth and fair. The NACA 6-series airfoils also have favorable critical-speed characteristics and do not appear to present unusual problems associated with the application of high-lift and lateral-control devices. Much of the data given in the NACA Advance Confidential Report entitled "Preliminary Low-Drag-Airfoil and Flap Data from Tests at Large Reynolds Number and Low Turbulence," by Eastman N. ...
Date: March 1, 1945
Creator: Stivers, Louis S.; Abbott, Ira H. & von Doenhoff, Albert E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Standard nomenclature for airspeeds with tables and charts for use in calculation of airspeed

Description: Symbols and definition of various airspeed terms that have been adopted as standard by the NACA subcommittee on aircraft structural design are presented. The equations, charts, and tables required in the evaluation of true airspeed, calibrated airspeed, equivalent airspeed, impact and dynamic pressures, and Mach and Reynolds numbers have been compiled. Tables of the standard atmosphere to an altitude of 65,000 feet and a tentative extension to an altitude of 100,000 feet are given along with the basic equations and constants on which both the standard atmosphere and the tentative extension are based.
Date: January 1, 1946
Creator: Aiken, William S , Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static thrust and power characteristics of six full-scale propellers

Description: Static thrust and power measurements were made of six full-scale propellers. The propellers were mounted in front of a liquid-cooled-engine nacelle and were tested at 15 different blade angles in the range from -7 1/2 degrees to 35 degrees at 0.75r. The test rig was located outdoors and the tests were made under conditions of approximately zero wind velocity.
Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Hartman, Erwin P & Biermann, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of drag characteristics of practical-construction wing sections

Description: The effect of several parameters on the drag characteristics of practical-construction wing sections have been considered and evaluated. The effects considered were those of surface roughness, surface waviness, compressive load, and de-icers. The data were obtained from a number of tests in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnels.
Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Quinn, John H , Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of Airfoil Data

Description: The historical development of NACA airfoils is briefly reviewed. New data are presented that permit the rapid calculation of the approximate pressure distributions for the older NACA four-digit and five-digit airfoils by the same methods used for the NACA 6-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6 and 7-series airfoils together with their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Detail data necessary for the application of the airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures placed at the end of the paper. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed, together with aerodynamic problems of application. (author).
Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Abbott, Ira H; Von Doenhoff, Albert E & Stivers, Louis, Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of section data on trailing-edge high-lift devices

Description: A summary has been made of available data on the characteristics of airfoil sections with trailing-edge high-lift devices. Data for plain, split, and slotted flaps are collected and analyzed. The effects of each of the variables involved in the design of the various types of flap are examined and, in cases where sufficient data are given, optimum configurations are deduced. Wherever possible, the effects of airfoil section, Reynolds number, and leading-edge roughness are shown. For single and double slotted flaps, where a large amount of unrelated data are available, maximum lift coefficients of many configurations are presented in tables.
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Cahill, Jones F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tank investigation of a powered dynamic model of a large long-range flying boat

Description: Principles for designing the optimum hull for a large long-range flying boat to meet the requirements of seaworthiness, minimum drag, and ability to take off and land at all operational gross loads were incorporated in a 1/12-size powered dynamic model of a four-engine transport flying boat having a design gross load of 165,000 pounds. These design principles included the selection of a moderate beam loading, ample forebody length, sufficient depth of step, and close adherence to the form of a streamline body. The aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of the model were investigated in Langley tank no. 1. Tests were made to determine the minimum allowable depth of step for adequate landing stability, the suitability of the fore-and-aft location of the step, the take-off performance, the spray characteristics, and the effects of simple spray-control devices. The application of the design criterions used and test results should be useful in the preliminary design of similar large flying boats.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Parkinson, John B; Olson, Roland E & Harr, Marvin I
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test of single-stage axial-flow fan

Description: A single-stage axial fan was built and tested in the shop of the propeller-research tunnel of the NACA. The fan comprised a simple 24-blade rotor having a diameter of 21 inches and a solidity of 0.86 and a set of 37 contravanes having a solidity of 1.33. The rotor was driven by a 25-horsepower motor capable of rotating at a speed of 3600 r.p.m. The fan was tested for volume, pressure, and efficiency over a range of delivery pressures and volumes for a wide range of contravane and blade-angle settings. The test results are presented in chart form in terms of nondimensional units in order that similar fans may be accurately designed with a minimum effort. The maximum efficiency (88 percent) was obtained by the fan at a blade angle of 30 degrees and a contravane angle of 70 degrees. An efficiency of 80 percent was obtained by the fan with the contravanes removed.
Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Bell, E Barton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Shear lag in box beams methods of analysis and experimental investigations

Description: The bending stresses in the covers of box beams or wide-flange beams differ appreciably from the stresses predicted by the ordinary bending theory on account of shear deformation of the flanges. The problem of predicting these differences has become known as the shear-lag problem. The first part of this paper deals with methods of shear-lag analysis suitable for practical use. The second part of the paper describes strain-gage tests made by the NACA to verify the theory. Three tests published by other investigators are also analyzed by the proposed method. The third part of the paper gives numerical examples illustrating the methods of analysis. An appendix gives comparisons with other methods, particularly with the method of Ebner and Koller.
Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Kuhn, Paul & Chiarito, Patrick T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sound-level measurements of a light airplane modified to reduce noise reaching the ground

Description: An Army liaison-type airplane, representative of personal airplanes in the 150 to 200 horsepower class, has been modified to reduce propeller and engine noise according to known principles of airplane-noise reduction. Noise-level measurements demonstrate that, with reference to an observer on the ground, a noisy airplane of this class can be made quiet -- perhaps more quiet than necessary. In order to avoid extreme and unnecessary modifications, acceptable noise levels must be determined.
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Vogeley, A W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stalling of helicopter blades

Description: Theoretical studies have predicted that operation of helicopter rotor beyond certain combinations of thrust, forward speed, and rotational speed might be prevented by rapidly increasing stalling of the retreating blade. The same studies also indicate that the efficiency of the rotor will increase until these limits are reached or closely approached, so that it is desirable to design helicopter rotors for operation close to the limits imposed by blade stalling. Inasmuch as the theoretical predictions of blade stalling involve numerous approximations and assumptions, an experimental investigation was needed to determine whether, in actual practice, the stall did occur and spread as predicted and to establish the amount of stalling that could be present without severe vibration or control difficulties being introduced. This report presents the results of such an investigation.
Date: January 1, 1946
Creator: Gustafson, F B & Myers, G C , Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interference method for obtaining the potential flow past an arbitrary cascade of airfoils

Description: A procedure is presented for obtaining the pressure distribution on an arbitrary airfoil section in cascade in a two-dimensional, incompressible, and nonviscous flow. The method considers directly the influence on a given airfoil of the rest of the cascade and evaluates this interference by an iterative process, which appeared to converge rapidly in the cases tried (about unit solidity, stagger angles of 0 degree and 45 degrees). Two variations of the basic interference calculations are described. One, which is accurate enough for most purposes, involves the substitution of sources, sinks, and vortices for the interfering airfoils; the other, which may be desirable for the final approximation, involves a contour integration. The computations are simplified by the use of a chart presented by Betz in a related paper. Illustrated examples are included.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Katzoff, S; Finn, Robert S & Laurence, James C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Internal-flow systems for aircraft

Description: An investigation has been made to determine efficient arrangements for an internal-flow system of an aircraft when such a system operates by itself or in combination with other flow systems. The investigation included a theoretical treatment of the problem and tests in the NACA 5-foot vertical wind tunnel of inlet and outlet openings in a flat plate and in a wing.
Date: January 1, 1941
Creator: Rogallo, F M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of a systematic group of NACA 1-series cowlings with and without spinners

Description: Report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the Langley propeller research tunnel to study cowling-spinner combinations based on the NACA 1-series nose inlets and to obtain systematic design data for one family of approximately ellipsoidal spinners. In the main part of the investigation, 11 of the related spinners were tested in various combinations with 9 NACA open-nose cowlings, which were also tested without spinners. The effects of location and shape of the spinner, shape of the inner surface of the cowling lip, and operation of a propeller having approximately oval shanks were investigated briefly. In addition, a study was conducted to determine the correct procedure for extrapolating design conditions determined from the low-speed test data to the design conditions at the actual flight Mach number.
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: Nichols, Mark R & Keith, Arvid L , Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of measurements in Langley full-scale tunnel of maximum lift coefficients and stalling characteristics of airplanes

Description: The results of measurements in the Langley full-scale tunnel of the maximum lift coefficients and stalling characteristics of airplanes have been collected. The data have been analyzed to show the nature of the effects on maximum lift and stall of wing geometry, fuselages and nacelles, propeller slipstream, surface roughness, and wing leading-edge appendages such as ducts, armaments, tip slats, and airspeed heads. Comparisons of full-scale-tunnel and flight measurements of maximum lift and stall are included in some cases, and the effects of the different testing techniques on the maximum-lift measurements are also given.
Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Sweberg, Harold H & Dingeldein, Richard C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of lateral-control research

Description: A summary has been made of the available information on lateral control. A discussion is given of the criterions used in lateral-control specifications, of the factors involved in obtaining satisfactory lateral control, and of the methods employed in making lateral-control investigations in flight and in wind tunnels. The available data on conventional flap-type ailerons having various types of aerodynamic balance are presented in a form convenient for use in design. The characteristics of spoiler devices and booster mechanisms are discussed. The effects of Mach number, boundary layer, and distortion of the wing or of the lateral-control system are considered insofar as the available information permits. An example is included to illustrate the use of the design data. The limitations of the available information and some of the lateral-control problems that remain to be solved are indicated.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Toll, Thomas A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Speed Tests of a Model Twin-Engine Low-Wing Transport Airplane

Description: Report presents the results of force tests made of a 1/8-scale model of a twin-engine low-wing transport airplane in the NACA 8-foot high-speed tunnel to investigate compressibility and interference effects of speeds up to 450 miles per hour. In addition to tests of the standard arrangement of the model, tests were made with several modifications designed to reduce the drag and to increase the critical speed.
Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Becker, John V & LEONARD LLOYD H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Speed Tests of Conventional Radial-Engine Cowlings

Description: The drag characteristics of eight radial-engine cowlings have been determined over a wide speed range in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. The pressure distribution over all cowlings was measured, to and above the speed of the compressibility burble, as an aid in interpreting the force tests. One-fifth-scale models of radial-engine cowlings on a wing-nacelle combination were used in the tests.
Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Robinson, Russell G & Becker, John V
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The induction of water to the inlet air as a means of internal cooling in aircraft-engine cylinders

Description: Report presents the results of investigations conducted on a full-scale air-cooled aircraft-engine cylinder of 202-cubic inch displacement to determine the effects of internal cooling by water induction on the maximum permissible power and output of an internal-combustion engine. For a range of fuel-air and water-fuel ratios, the engine inlet pressure was increased until knock was detected aurally, the power was then decreased 7 percent holding the ratios constant. The data indicated that water was a very effective internal coolant, permitting large increases in engine power as limited by either knock or by cylinder temperatures.
Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Rothrock, Addison M; Krsek, Alois, Jr & Jones, Anthony W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flutter calculations in three degrees of freedom

Description: The present paper is a continuation of the general study of flutter published in NACA reports nos. 496 and 685. The paper is mainly devoted to flutter in three degrees of freedom (bending, torsion, and aileron) for which a number of selected cases have been calculated and presented in graphical form. The results are analyzed and discussed with regard to the effects of structural damping, of fractional-span ailerons, and of mass-balancing. The analysis shows that more emphasis should be put on the effect of structural damping and less on mass-balancing. The conclusion is drawn that a definite minimum amount of structural damping, which is usually found to be present, is essential in the calculations for an adequate description of the flutter case. Theoretical flutter predictions are thus brought into closer agreement with the facts of experience. A brief discussion is included of a particular biplane that had experienced flutter at about 200 miles per hour. Some simplifications have been achieved in the method of calculation. (author).
Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Theodorsen, Theodore & Garrick, I E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formulas for propellers in yaw and charts of the side-force derivative

Description: General formulas are given for propellers for the rate of change of side-force coefficient with angle of yaw and for the rate of change of pitching-moment coefficient with angle of yaw. Charts of the side-force derivative are given for two propellers of different plan form. The charts cover solidities of two to six blades and single and dual rotation. The blade angle ranges from 15 degrees or 20 degrees to 60 degrees.
Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Ribner, Herbert S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department