Congressional Research Service Reports - 14 Matching Results

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Genetically Engineered Fish and Seafood
Genetic engineering techniques allow the manipulation of inherited traits to modify organisms. Genetically modified (GM) fish and seafood products are currently under development and may offer potential benefits such as increasing aquaculture productivity and addressing human health concerns. However, some critics of this rapidly evolving field are concerned that current technological and regulatory safeguards are inadequate to protect the environment and ensure public acceptance of these products. This report discusses various regulatory and environmental concerns regarding GM fish and seafood, then discusses the possible benefits and disadvantages of their use.
Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2006
This report discusses federal research and development (R&D) funding. The Bush Administration requested $132.4 billion in R&D funding for FY2006. This sum represents a $400 million increase over the FY2005 estimated funding level of $132 billion.
The Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Program: Funding Issues and Activities
No Description Available.
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
Science and technology have a pervasive influence over a wide range of issues confronting the nation. Decisions on how much federal funding to invest in research and development (R&D) and determining what programs have the highest priority, for example, may have implications for homeland security, new high technology industries, government/private sector cooperation in R&D, and myriad other areas. This report indicates the sweep of science and technology in many public policy issues, such as global climate change, stem cell research, patent protection, and telecommunications reform. This report also addresses key issues that directly affect, or are affected by, science and technology.
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description Available.
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description Available.
Financing Catastrophic Risk: Summary of the Homeowners' Defense Act of 2009 (S. 505 and H.R. 2555)
This report discusses the drastic increase in demand for homeowners' insurance in Atlantic and Gulf Coast states following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. This report also discusses various measures and efforts underway to enhance insurer capacity, pursue alternative forms of risk transfer, and create a national catastrophe financing facility, the last of which is an issue under considerable debate.
Counterterrorism Research and Development: Funding, Priority-setting, and Coordination
This report describes the basic R&D issues concern regarding the adequacy of planning/coordination mechanisms, including those in the Office of Science and Technology Policy and Office of Homeland Security; which counterterrorism R&D should be transferred to a new department; and how other R&D counterterrorism activities that are not transferred should be coordinated.
Federal Research and Development: Budgeting and Priority-Setting Issues, 107th Congress
No Description Available.
Federal Research and Development: Budgeting and Priority-Setting Issues, 108th Congress
This report discusses federal funding for research and development. National R&D funding continues to grow, but the federal R&D share has declined to less than 30% of the total. Debates focus on which fields of federal R&D should be increased and how to set priorities and to "balance" health and nonhealth fields.
Technology Transfer: Use of Federally Funded Research and Development
No Description Available.
The Role of Risk Analysis and Risk Management in Environmental Protection
No Description Available.
Daylight Saving Time
Currently, in most parts of the United States, timepieces are moved forward one hour in the spring and back one hour in the fall to provide an extended daylight period during the summer months. This is known as Daylight Saving Time (DST). Much debate and many changes led to this present practice. This report provides a brief history of the issues surrounding DST, an outline of the legislation that created and modified it, and a list of references to more discussions.
Daylight Saving Time
Currently, in most parts of the United States, timepieces are moved forward one hour in the spring and back one hour in the fall to provide an extended daylight period during the summer months. This is known as Daylight Saving Time (DST). Much debate and many changes led to this present practice. This report provides a brief history of the issues surrounding DST, an outline of the legislation that created and modified it, and a list of references to more discussions.