Congressional Research Service Reports - 284 Matching Results

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The Budget Enforcement Act of 1997

Description: President Clinton signed two reconciliation acts into law in August 1997 as part of a plan to balance the budget by FY2002. To ensure compliance with this goal, enforcement procedures were included in one of the acts in a title referred to separately as the Budget Enforcement Act (BEA) of 1997. The BEA of 1997 extends procedures under the Budget Enforcement Act (BEA) of 1990 through FY2002
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Keith, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Congressional Oversight

Description: Congressional oversight of policy implementation and administration, which has occurred throughout the U.S. government experience under the Constitution, takes a variety of forms and utilizes various techniques. These range from specialized investigations by select committees to annual appropriations hearings, and from informal communications between Members or congressional staff and executive personnel to the use of extra congressional mechanisms, such as offices of inspector general and study commissions. Oversight, moreover, is supported by a variety of authorities—the Constitution, public law, and chamber and committee rules—and is an integral part of the system of checks and balances between the legislature and the executive
Date: October 10, 1997
Creator: Kaiser, Frederick M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Protection Agency: FY1998 Budget

Description: EPA appropriations are included in the annual VA-HUD-Independent Agencies Appropriation Bill. Two major issues were whether Superfund cleanups should be accelerated in the absence of statutory reforms and whether the requested state assistance funds are adequate. Because the House and Senate were in agreement on not granting the requested 50% increase in Superfund and in passing increased state funds, the chief conference issue was expected to focus on the roughly $225 million difference between the House and Senate versions. However, a veto threat over Superfund program funding made this a key conference issue.
Date: October 14, 1997
Creator: Lee, Martin R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

conversations with Division staff. By your correspondence, you request relief on behalf of “X”, a registered commodity pool operator (“CPO”) and commodity trading advisor (“CTA”), with regard to the “Fund,” a commodity pool operated by “X.” You request confirmation that “X” may 1 continue to claim relief under Rule 4.7(a) with respect to the Fund notwithstanding investment in the Fund by a person who is not a qualified eligible participant (“QEP”). Based upon the representations contained in your letter, as supplemented, we understand the relevant facts to be as follows. On September 15, 1997, “X” filed a Notice of Claim for Exemption pursuant to Rule 4.7 on behalf of the Fund. Pursuant to this exemption, interests in the Fund may be sold only to QEPs. However, “X” would like to admit “A,” a non-QEP, into the Fund. In support of your request, you state that “A” is the father of “B,” the president, sole shareholder, and sole director of “X.” “A” has more than 30 years of investment experience. From the mid1950’s until the late 1960’s, “A” served as the director and vice-president of finance for a Fortune 500 mining and manufacturing concern. One of “A’s” responsibilities at this company was to supervise the investments of the company’s large pension funds. Since his retirement in 1975, “A” has supported himself not only by income from his pension but also from the returns generated by an investment portfolio which he actively manages. Based upon your representations, it appears that granting the requested relief would not be contrary to the public interest and the purpose of Rule 4.7. Accordingly the Division will not recommend that the Commission take any enforcement action against “X” for failure to comply with Rule 4.7(a) if it continues to claim relief pursuant to Rule 4.7, notwithstanding investment by “A” in the Fund. This relief is subject to the condition that “A” consent in writing to being treated as a QEP. You should be aware that the relief granted to “X” does not excuse “X” from compliance with any otherwise applicable requirements contained in the Commodity Exchange Act (the “Act”) or in the Commission’s regulations thereunder. For example, “X” remains subject to Section 4o of the

Description: No Description Available.
Date: October 17, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast-Track Trade Authority Proposals: Which Environmental Issues are Included in the Principal Negotiating Objectives?

Description: This report discusses fast-track negotiating authority, which provides that Congress will consider trade agreements within mandatory deadlines, with limited debate, and without amendment. Environmental provisions are eligible for the fast-track procedure only if they meet at least one of the principal trade negotiating objectives.
Date: October 17, 1997
Creator: Wilson, Arlene
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Brief Introduction to the Federal Budget Process

Description: This report provides a brief introduction to the federal budget process. Key budget concepts and terminology are defined and explained. The separate procedures that make up the federal budget process are identified and their salient features described. While a complete understanding of federal budgeting probably can be obtained only after much observation and study of the process in operation, broad exposure to its rudiments is a useful first step. Various resources “for additional reading” are identified at the end of this report, which the reader may find helpful in exploring the subject in greater depth.
Date: October 20, 1997
Creator: Keith, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Sanctions to Achieve U.S. Foreign Policy Goals: Discussion and Guide to Current Law

Description: This report provides background on the range of actions that might be termed foreign policy sanctions and the events that might necessitate their use. Criteria are offered that legislators might consider to judge when sanctions might be appropriate, approaches that might be effective, aspects of the use of sanctions that are sometimes overlooked or not considered fully. The report provides an uncomplicated "map" of where sanctions policies and options currently lay in U. S. law.
Date: October 20, 1997
Creator: Rennack, Dianne E. & Shuey, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Agricultural Exports: Technical Barriers to Trade

Description: Technical barriers to trade (TBTs) are widely divergent measures that countries use to regulate rnarkets, protect their consumers, and preserve natural resources, but which can also discriminate against imports in favor of domestic products. Most TBTs in agriculture are sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures designed to protect humans, animals, and plants from contaminants, diseases, and pests. In the wake of new trade agreements aimed at reducing tariffs, import quotas, and other trade barriers, TBTs have become more prominent concerns for agricultural exporters and policymakers.
Date: October 21, 1997
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department