Congressional Research Service Reports - 72 Matching Results

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Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Description: The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation.
Date: November 14, 2003
Creator: Bowman, Steven R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Airborne Laser (ABL): Issues for Congress

Description: This report examines the airborne laser (ABL) program and budget status. It also examines a variety of related issues, including the questionable maturity of ABL technologies, the number of ABL platforms the United States should acquire, and to what degree the United STates should invest in alternative technologies in the event that the ABL may not prove successful. This report does not provide a detailed technical assessment of the ABL program (see CRS Report RL30185, The Airborne Laser Anti-Missile Program).
Date: October 22, 2003
Creator: Bolkcom, Christopher & Hildreth, Steven A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China: Possible Missile Technology Transfers under U.S. Satellite Export Policy - Actions and Chronology

Description: This CRS Report discusses security concerns, significant congressional and administration action, and a comprehensive chronology pertaining to satellite exports to the PRC. The report discusses issues for U.S. foreign and security policy (including that on China and weapons nonproliferation), such as: What are the benefits and costs of satellite exports to China for U.S. economic and security interests? Should the United States continue, change, or cease the policy in place since the Reagan Administration that has allowed exports of satellites to China (for its launch and – increasingly – for its use)? Etc.
Date: October 6, 2003
Creator: Kan, Shirley A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Policy Issues

Description: Congress has long been concerned about whether U.S. policy advances the national interest in reducing the role of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and missiles that could deliver them. China has taken some steps to mollify U.S. concerns about its role in weapons proliferation. Skeptics question whether China's cooperation in weapons nonproliferation has warranted President Bush's pursuit of stronger bilateral ties. This report discusses the national security problem of China's role in weapons proliferation and issues related to the U.S. policy response, including legislation, since the mid-1990s.
Date: September 24, 2003
Creator: Kan, Shirley A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1995-2002

Description: This report is prepared annually to provide unclassified quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding eight calendar years. Some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world. The data in the report illustrate how global patterns of conventional arms transfers have changed in the post-Cold War and post-Persian Gulf War years.
Date: September 22, 2003
Creator: Grimmett, Richard F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Air Force KC-767 Tanker Lease Proposal: Key Issues for Congress

Description: The Air Force is proposing to replace 133 of its oldest Boeing KC-135E aerial refueling tanker aircraft by leasing 100 new Boeing KC-767 tankers instead of initially buying them outright. The proposed lease was authorized by Section 8159 of the FY2002 DOD Appropriations Act (P.L. 107-117 of January 10, 2002). The main issue for Congress is whether to approve or disapprove the lease. This report examines the lease proposal and its ramifications by providing background information on the Air Force’s tanker fleet, the Boeing 767 tanker, and the proposed lease itself. Then the report analyzes potential oversight issues for Congress relating to the merits of the proposed lease:
Date: September 2, 2003
Creator: Bolkcom, Christopher
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Air Force KC-767 Tanker Lease Proposal: Key Issues for Congress

Description: The Air Force is proposing to replace 133 of its oldest Boeing KC-135E aerial refueling tanker aircraft by leasing 100 new Boeing KC-767 tankers instead of initially buying them outright. The proposed lease was authorized by Section 8159 of the FY2002 DOD Appropriations Act (P.L. 107-117 of January 10, 2002). The main issue for Congress is whether to approve or disapprove the lease. This report examines the lease proposal and its ramifications by providing background information on the Air Force’s tanker fleet, the Boeing 767 tanker, and the proposed lease itself. Then the report analyzes potential oversight issues for Congress relating to the merits of the proposed lease:
Date: August 29, 2003
Creator: Bolkcom, Christopher
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Policy Issues

Description: Congress has long been concerned about whether U.S. policy advances the national interest in reducing the role of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and missiles that could deliver them. China has taken some steps to mollify U.S. concerns about its role in weapons proliferation. Skeptics question whether China's cooperation in weapons nonproliferation has warranted President Bush's pursuit of stronger bilateral ties. This report discusses the national security problem of China's role in weapons proliferation and issues related to the U.S. policy response, including legislation, since the mid-1990s.
Date: August 8, 2003
Creator: Kan, Shirley A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department