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Does Trade Reduce Wages of U.S. Workers?

Description: This report examines in some detail the hypothesis that trade is undermining the economic status of the American worker. Two questions are addressed: one, Has trade tended to reduce the average level of wages? and, two, Has trade increased the inequality of wages? The general conclusion reached is that poor wage performance is largely a problem of the domestic economy, that would have occurred with or without trade.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Elwell, Craig K.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Country Applicability of the U.S. Most-Favored-Nation Status

Description: The United States accords permanent most-favored-nation (MFN) treatment to all its trading partners except six countries to which it is denied by law and 14 countries whose MFN status is temporary and subject to the conditions of Title IV of the Trade Act of 1974.
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Pregelj, Vladimir N.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Country Applicability of the U.S. Most-Favored-Nation Status

Description: The United States accords permanent most-favored-nation (MFN) treatment to all its trading partners except six countries to which it is denied by law and 14 countries whose MFN status is temporary and subject to the conditions of Title IV of the Trade Act of 1974.
Date: January 30, 1998
Creator: Pregelj, Vladimir N.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast Track for Trade Agreements: Procedural Controls for Congress and Proposed Alternatives

Description: This report discusses the fast track trade procedures in the Trade Act of 1974 operate as procedural rules of the House and Senate, and the statute itself declares them to be enacted as an exercise of the constitutional authority of each house to determine its own rules. These procedures prevent Congress from altering an implementing bill or declining to act, but permit it to enact or reject the bill. By these means Congress retains authority to legislate in the areas covered, yet affords the President conditions for effective negotiation.
Date: October 31, 1997
Creator: Beth, Richard S
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The World Trade Organization (WTO) Seattle Ministerial Conference

Description: On November 30th to December 3rd, 1999, the highest decision-making body of the World Trade Organization (WTO), called the Ministerial Conference, will meet in Seattle to make broad policy decisions. The key issue for the trade ministers attending the meeting will be to decide on the structure and topics for the agenda of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations. Countries have committed to discuss agriculture and services trade in the new round. Other items that have been proposed for inclusion in the new round or for earlier consideration include tariff reductions, concessions for developing countries, labor issues and the environment, and the WTO decision-making process. Major labor, environmental, and consumer interest groups are expected to be present in Seattle to argue for more consideration of workers' rights and the environment within the WTO. This report provides a summary background on preparations for the Ministerial and related issues of congressional interest.
Date: November 19, 1999
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Reappraisal of Foreign Investment Policy

Description: The rise of the multinational corporation and the increased flow of capital across national borders have raised anew the question of how to treat foreign direct investment, both inward and outward. The U.S. government and, increasingly, other governments advocate that, with some exceptions, economic policies should be neutral in the treatment of investment, foreign and domestic, inward and outward. This report discusses the changing view of foreign investment, both nationally and internationally.
Date: February 8, 1994
Creator: Reifman, Alfred
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 1995 Japan-U.S. Auto and Parts Trade Dispute: Terms of the Settlement and Implications

Description: On June 28, 1995, the United States and Japan reached a settlement in a long-running dispute over access to Japan's market for automobiles and parts. 100-percent tariffs by the United States on imports of luxury cars from Japan had been threatened under a Section 301 unfair trade practices case dealing with the aftermarket for autoparts in Japan. This report describes the dispute, the settlement, and questions and issues that still remain.
Date: August 9, 1995
Creator: Nanto, Dick K. & Bass, Gwenell L.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The European Community - Japan Automobile Agreement

Description: The European Community (EC) and Japan reached an agreement on trade in automobiles in July 1991. The agreement restricts exports of automobiles from Japan to the EC to 1.23 million cars per year until the end of 1999. The Commission of the European Communities estimates that Japanese transplant production in the EC will amount to 1.2 million cars per year in 1999. The Japanese appear to concur with this estimate but do not agree that it constitutes a cap on transplant investment or production. Whether the agreement covers the export of U.S.-built Japanese transplants to the EC is unclear. If the agreement covers, or has the effect of discouraging, such exports, it would be a cause for concern for U.S. policymakers. U.S. trade officials have reportedly discussed the issue with Japanese counterparts. It is unknown whether U.S. concerns have been addressed to European Community (EC) officials.
Date: January 27, 1992
Creator: Harrison, Glennon J
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department