Congressional Research Service Reports - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED
Seafarer: Extremely Low Frequency Naval Communications System
No Description Available.
Commerical Television Broadcasting: An Economic Analysis of Its Structure and Competitive Alternatives
This report analyzes the economic structure of both the conventional commercial television broadcasting industry as well as the significant commercial competitive alternatives. Federal Communications Commission policies and their effect on the competitive structure and development of the television industry are also discussed.
The Telecommunications Act of 1982 (H.R. 5158, 97th Congress): Provisions and Controversies
No Description Available.
Proposals for Revision of the Communications Act of 1934: Telecommunications Issues
No Description Available.
A Glossary of Selected Telecommunications Terms
The following glossary provides short definitions and descriptions of selected telecommunications terminology, agencies, and organizations, as well as a listing of key laws and Federal Communications Commission regulations and decisions.
Political Broadcasts - Regulate or Deregulate?
No Description Available.
The American Telephone and Telegraph Divestiture: Background, Provisions, and Restructuring
On January 1, 1984, The American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) divested itself of a major portion of its organizational structure and functions. Under the post-divestiture environment the once fully-integrated Bell System is now reorganized into the "new" AT&T and seven Ladependent regional holding companies -- American Information Technologies Corp., 3ell Atlantic Corp., 3ell- South Corp., NYNEX Corp., Pacific Telesis Group., Southwestern Bell Corp., and U.S. West, Inc. The following analysis provides an overview of the pre- and post-divestiture organizational structure and details the evolution of the antitrust action which resulted in this divestiture.
Radio Marti
No Description Available.
AT and T Divestiture: Restructuring the U.S. Domestic Telephone Industry
On January 8, 1982, the Justice Department and the American Telephone and Telegraph Company announced the settlement of the Government's seven year old antitrust suit against AT&T. Nineteen months later, in August 1983, U.S. District Court Judge Harold Greene gave final approval to the AT& T divestiture agreement. The breakup of AT&T will affect every aspect of the U.S. domestic telephone industry from the yellow pages to the manufacture of telephones. AT&T officially spun off its 22 local operating companies into seven regional phone companies on January 1, 1984. This Info Pack focuses on the Department of Justice settlement with AT&T and how the resulting divestiture will affect the U.S. domestic telephone industry.
Advertising of Alcoholic Beverages: Should a Radio and TV Ban be Imposed?
This issue brief discusses the ongoing debate centered around television and radio advertising of alcoholic beverages, especially as it relates to the possible negative influence on the drinking habits of minors.
Obscenity: A Legal Primer
No Description Available.
Telephone Industry Issues
No Description Available.
Telephone Industry Residential Subscriber Line Charges and the Lifeline Option
No Description Available.
Military and Civilian Satellites in Support of Allied Forces in the Persian Gulf War
No Description Available.
China/Asia Broadcasting: Proposals for New U.S. Surrogate Services
No Description Available.
Radio and Television Broadcasting to Cuba: Background and Current Issues
This report provides a legislative history and funding levels for Cuba Broadcasting. It discusses specific concerns some lawmakers have had with Radio and TV Marti over the years, and presents the Panel's recommendations and the USIA Director's response and determinations, as required by the FYI994 appropriations act.
The Information Superhighway: Status and Issues
No Description Available.
How to Obtain Copies of Videotapes of Proceedings of Congress and Network and Cable Television Broadcasts
No Description Available.
Free and Reduced-Rate Television Time for Potential Candidates
No Description Available.
Terrorism, the Media, and the Government: Perspectives, Trends, and Options for Policymakers
No Description Available.
Radio Free Asia
No Description Available.
V-Chip and TV Ratings: Helping Parents Supervise Their Children's Television Viewing
No Description Available.
Radiofrequency Spectrum Management
No Description Available.
Satellite Television License of the Copyright Act (17 U.S.C. Section 119) and the 1997 Rate Adjustment
This report summarizes the basic features of the television satellite compulsory license of the Copyright Act (17 U.S.C. 119), including the rate adjustment procedures; reviews the October 1997 rate adjustment setting the current 27-cent per signal per month per subscriber rate; and summarizes recent legislative proposals to stay further implementation of the 1997 rate adjustment, or to revise the section 119 license.
Television Satellite and Cable Retransmission of Broadcast Video Programming Under the Copyright Act’s Compulsory Licenses
This report reviews the history and background of the cable and television satellite licenses of the Copyright Act, reviews the Satellite Home Viewer Act of 1994, and notes recent developments, including: the 1997 satellite license rate adjustment; pending bills relating to the compulsory licenses; and the August 1997 report of the Copyright Office on these licenses.
The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
Passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-104) codified the long standing policy commitment to ensure universal service in the provision of telecommunications services. The 1996 Act also expanded the concept to include, among other principles, that elementary schools and classrooms, and libraries should have access to telecommunications services for educational purposes at discounted rates. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was tasked with implementing the universal provisions of the Act and on May 7, 1997, adopted its order detailing its guidelines.
Telephone Excise Tax
No Description Available.
The Federal Excise Tax on Telephone Service: A History
No Description Available.
E-Rate for Schools: Background on Telecommunications Discounts Through the Universal Service Fund
No Description Available.
Low Power FM Radio Service: Regulatory and Congressional Issues
No Description Available.
Telecommunications Services Trade and the WTO Agreement
No Description Available.
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description Available.
Third Generation ("3G") Mobile Wireless Technologies and Services
No Description Available.
Satellite Television: An Analysis of Legislation Creating Loan Guarantees for Providing Local Broadcast TV Signals
No Description Available.
The Telephone Excise Tax: Revenues, Effects, and Repeal Proposals
No Description Available.
V-Chip and TV Ratings: Helping Parents Supervise Their Children's Television Viewing
No Description Available.
“Junk E-mail”: An Overview of Issues and Legislation Concerning Unsolicited Commercial Electronic Mail (“Spam”)
This report discusses unsolicited commercial e-mail (UCE), also called “spam” or “junk e-mail.” Not only can it be a nuisance, but its cost may be passed on to consumers through higher charges from Internet service providers who must upgrade their systems to handle the traffic.
“Junk E-mail”: An Overview of Issues and Legislation Concerning Unsolicited Commercial Electronic Mail (“Spam”)
This report discusses unsolicited commercial e-mail (UCE), also called “spam” or “junk e-mail.” Not only can it be a nuisance, but its cost may be passed on to consumers through higher charges from Internet service providers who must upgrade their systems to handle the traffic.
"Junk E-mail": An Overview of Issues and Legislation Concerning Unsolicited Commercial Electronic Mail ("Spam")
Unsolicited commercial e-mail (UCE), also called “spam” or “junk e-mail,” aggravates many computer users. Not only can it be a nuisance, but its cost may be passed on to consumers through higher charges from Internet service providers who must upgrade their systems to handle the traffic. Proponents of UCE insist it is a legitimate marketing technique and protected by the First Amendment. Legislation to place limits on UCE was considered by the last two Congresses, but no bill cleared Congress. Several bills have been introduced in the 107th Congress. H.R. 718 was reported from the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the House Judiciary Committee (H. Rept. 107-41, Parts 1 and 2). The two versions are quite different. S. 630 was ordered reported from the Senate Commerce Committee.
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description Available.
Telemarketing: Dealing With Unwanted Telemarketing Calls
This report provides summaries of the federal laws and regulations particular to telemarketing, the establishment of a national do-not-call registry, and the options that are available to consumers to limit the calls that they receive from telemarketers and to report questionable telemarketing practices to local or federal authorities. The report also lists sources of additional information with addresses, phone numbers, and Internet sites (if available).
Telephone Bills: Charges on Local Telephone Bills
No Description Available.
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off.
Satellite Television: Provisions of SHVIA and LOCAL, and Continuing Issues
No Description Available.
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description Available.
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description Available.
Electronic Payments and the U.S. Payments System
This report provides a framework for understanding the paper-based and electronic components of the current U.S. payments system. It begins with a basic overview of the payments system, explaining the relative size and growth of various methods of payment. The report discusses paper-based payments and then examines the operations of wholesale and retail electronic payments. Finally, the report discusses some of the major policy issues concerning the regulation and supervision of electronic payments.
Electronic Congress: Proposals and Issues
The events of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent anthrax incidents have prompted some observers to suggest creating a capability for a virtual or electronic Congress (e-Congress) that could function in the event of an emergency. Currently, it is unclear exactly how an e-Congress would be constituted and operated; however, a proposal (H.R. 3481) has been introduced to require the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to investigate the feasibility and costs of implementing a computer system for remote voting and communication for Congress to ensure business continuity for congressional operations.
Meeting Public Safety Spectrum Needs
No Description Available.
Satellite Television: Provisions of SHVIA and LOCAL, and Continuing Issues
No Description Available.