Congressional Research Service Reports - 153 Matching Results

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The International Space Station and the Iran Nonproliferation Act (INA): The Bush Administration's Proposed INA Amendment
The Iran Nonproliferation Act (P.L. 106-178), as originally enacted, prohibited the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from purchasing Russian goods and services for the U.S.-led International Space Station (ISS) unless the President certified that Russia was not proliferating certain technologies to Iran. On July 12, 2005, the Bush Administration submitted to Congress an amendment to allow NASA to purchase goods and services from Russia to support the ISS. That presented a classic policy dilemma. Without access to Russian spacecraft, the U.S. use of the ISS could be extremely limited. Yet Russian entities were continuing proliferation activities relating to missile proliferation according to the Department of State. This report explains the Bush Administration proposal and resulting congressional action.
Space Policy and Funding: Military Uses of Space
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An Overview of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE)
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Military and Civilian Satellites in Support of Allied Forces in the Persian Gulf War
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The International Space Station and the Iran Nonproliferation Act (INA): The Bush Administration's Proposed INA Amendment
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Selected Articles and Bibliography on the Military Uses of Space
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Space Issues
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Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Programs: Issues for Congress
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Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Programs: Issues for Congress
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Military Space Programs: Issues Concerning DOD's SBIRS and STSS Programs
This report discusses the Space Tracking and Surveillance System (STSS, formerly SBIRS-Low), managed by the Missile Defense Agency, which performs missile tracking and target discrimination for missile defense objectives.
Military Space Programs: Issues Concerning DOD's SBIRS and STSS Programs
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Military Space Programs: Issues Concerning DOD's SBIRS and STSS Programs
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Military Space Programs: Issues Concerning DOD's SBIRS and STSS Programs
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Military Space Programs: Issues Concerning DOD's SBIRS and STSS Programs
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U.S. Military Space Programs: An Overview of Appropriations and Current Issues
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The Manhattan Project, the Apollo Program, and Federal Energy Technology R&D Programs: A Comparative Analysis
Some policymakers have concluded that the energy challenges facing the United States are so critical that a concentrated investment in energy research and development (R&D) should be undertaken. The Manhattan project, which produced the atomic bomb, and the Apollo program, which landed American men on the moon, have been cited as examples of the success such R&D investments can yield. Investment in federal energy technology R&D programs of the 1970s, in response to two energy crises, have generally been viewed as less successful than the earlier two efforts. This report compares and contrasts the goals of, and the investments in, the three initiatives, which may provide useful insights for Congress as it assesses and debates the nation's energy policy.
Military Role in Space Control: A Primer
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China's Space Program: Options for U.S.-China Cooperation
This report outlines recent activities and future plans in China's civilian space sector. It also discusses benefits and trade-offs of possible U.S.-China collaboration in space, as well as several options to improve space relations, including information exchange, policy dialogue, and joint activities. The report also includes discussion of China's controversial January 2007 testing of antisatellite weapons.
The Iran Nonproliferation Act and the International Space Station: Issues and Options
The Iran Nonproliferation Act of 2000 (INA) was enacted to help stop foreign transfers to Iran of weapons of mass destruction, missile technology, and advanced conventional weapons technology, particularly from Russia. Section 6 of the INA bans U.S. payments to Russia in connection with the International Space Station (ISS) unless the U.S. President determines that Russia is taking steps to prevent such proliferation. The ISS is currently under construction in orbit. According to current plans, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will become dependent on Russia for certain ISS crew-related services beginning in April 2006 for which NASA must pay. Thus, the INA could significantly affect U.S. utilization of ISS. This report outlines the history of INA, its effect on Russian and Iranian proliferation, its impact on the ISS program, and options for resolving associated issues.
China's Space Program: Options for U.S.-China Cooperation
China has a determined, yet still modest, program of civilian space activities planned for the next decade. The potential for U.S.-China cooperation in space -- an issue of interest to Congress -- has become more controversial since the January 2007 Chinese anti-satellite test. Some argue that Chinese capabilities now threaten U.S. space assets in low earth orbit. Others stress the need to expand dialogue with China. This report outlines recent activities and future plans in China's civilian space sector. It also discusses benefits and trade-offs of possible U.S.-China collaboration in space, as well as several options to improve space relations, including information exchange, policy dialogue, and joint activities.
Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI): Mission Objectives for Directing the Program
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Strategic Defense Initiative: Selected References, 1986-1988
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The Iran Nonproliferation Act and the International Space Station: Issues and Options
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