Congressional Research Service Reports - 266 Matching Results

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A Comparison of Benefits Earned Under Social Security and Civil Service Retirement
This report provides a brief side-by-side comparison of Civil Service Retirement and Social Security benefits.
Universal Social Security Coverage: Extending Mandatory Coverage
No Description Available.
Social Security Financing
No Description Available.
Social Security Student Benefits
No Description Available.
Social Security: Alien Beneficiaries
No Description Available.
Social Security Benefits for Prisoners
No Description Available.
Social Security: Reexamining Eligibility for Disability Benefits
No Description Available.
Cash and Non-Cash Benefits for Persons with Limited Income: Eligibility Rules, Recipient and Expenditure Data, FY1981-83
This report summarizes basic eligibility rules, as of May 1984, for more than 70 cash and non-cash programs that benefit primarily persons of limited income. It also gives funding formulas, benefit levels, and, for fiscal years 1981-1983, recipient numbers and expenditure data for each program.
Social Security: The Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) in January 1988
No Description Available.
Social Security: How is it Treated in Determining the Federal Budget?
No Description Available.
Summary of Major Changes in the Social Security Cash Benefits Program: 1935-1996
No Description Available.
Social Security: Recommendations of the 1994-1996 Advisory Council on Social Security
No Description Available.
Social Security Financing Reform: Lessons from the 1983 Amendments
No Description Available.
Social Security Reform: How Much of a Role Could Private Retirement Accounts Play?
No Description Available.
Ideas for Privatizing Social Security
No Description Available.
Social Security Taxes: Where Do Surplus Taxes Go and How Are They Used?
No Description Available.
Social Security: Brief Facts and Statistics
No Description Available.
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?
No Description Available.
The Financial Outlook for Social Security and Medicare
No Description Available.
Social Security: The Relationship of Taxes and Benefits for Past, Present, and Future Retirees
No Description Available.
Current Social Security Issues
Social Security is the focus of intense public interest. Projected long-range funding problems, public skepticism about its future, and a growing perception that Social Security will not be as good a value for future retirees as it is today are fueling calls for reform. This report discusses a number of the major Social Security issues currently drawing congressional attention.
Current Social Security Issues
Social Security is the focus of intense public interest. Projected long-range funding problems, public skepticism about its future, and a growing perception that Social Security will not be as good a value for future retirees as it is today are fueling calls for reform. This report, updated regularly, discusses a number of the major Social Security issues currently drawing congressional attention.
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?
No Description Available.
Tax Code Termination Act: A Fact Sheet
This report discusses the Tax Code Termination Act, which would “sunset” (repeal) the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 on December 31, 2002 and would require that any new federal tax system that is adopted be approved not later than July 4, 2002.
Social Security Taxes: Where Do Surplus Taxes Go and How Are They Used?
No Description Available.
Social Security Reform: Bills in the 106th Congress
The Social Security system is projected to have long-range funding problems. Although the system’s income currently exceeds its expenditures, its trust funds are projected to be depleted in 2037. Concern about the problem and a belief that the remedy lies partly in economic growth that could be bolstered by changes to the system have led to introduction of a number of bills incorporating varying degrees of reform. This report describes the funding problem in some detail, summarizes many of the reform bills introduced in the 106th Congress, and provides a list of other related CRS reports.
Social Security: Summary of Major Changes in the Cash Benefits Program
No Description Available.
Social Security Reform: The Issue of Individual Versus Collective Investment for Retirement
This report discusses a myriad of issues have been raised in the current Social Security debate, in particular the question of whether and how the nation’s financial markets might be used to reform the system.
Social Security: Raising the Retirement Age Background and Issues
The Social Security “full retirement age” — the age at which retired workers, aged spouses, or surviving aged spouses receive benefits that are not reduced for “early” retirement — will gradually rise from 65 to 67 beginning with people who attain age 62 in 2000 (i.e., those born in 1938). Early retirement benefits will still be available beginning at age 62 (age 60 for aged widows and widowers), but at lower levels. This report discusses bills introduced in the last four Congresses that would, among other things, accelerate the phase-in of the increase in the full retirement age to 67, raise the early retirement age to 65 or 67, and raise the full retirement age to 69 or 70.
Social Security Reform: How Much of a Role Could Personal Retirement Accounts Play?
This report illustrates the potential accumulations of personal savings accounts intended for retirement savings, given a range of possible contribution amounts and interest rates. It is intended to provide information about how to evaluate the possible role of personal accounts in the debate on Social Security reform.
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?
This report discusses social security and its place in the federal budget. As a result of a series of laws enacted in 1983, 1985 and 1990, Social Security is considered to be "off budget" for federal budget purposes. While the meaning of this might seem obvious--that Social Security is not to be considered as part of the federal budget--many people are confused by the continued use of aggregate budget figures that include Social Security's receipts and expenditures.
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?
No Description Available.
Social Security: Taxation of Benefits
No Description Available.
Social Security's Treatment Under the Federal Budget: A Summary
This report discusses the treatment of Social Security in the federal budget, which has become a major fiscal policy issue. Congressional views about what to do with budget surpluses are diverse—ranging from buying down the outstanding federal debt to cutting taxes to increasing spending. However, support for the proposition of “protecting” Social Security surpluses is substantial.
Social Security Reform
No Description Available.
Social Security Reform
No Description Available.
Social Security Reform: Bills in the 106th Congress
No Description Available.
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?
No Description Available.
Social Security, Saving, and the Economy
No Description Available.
The Financial Outlook for Social Security and Medicare
No Description Available.
Social Security Reform
No Description Available.
Social Security and Medicare "Lock Boxes"
No Description Available.
Social Security Benefits Are Not Paid for the Month of Death: A Fact Sheet
Social security benefits are not paid for the month in which a recipient dies. Legislation is routinely introduced that would either pay the full amount of the benefits for the month of death or pro-rate the benefits based on the proportion of the month that the recipient was alive.
Social Security's Treatment Under the Federal Budget: A Summary
No Description Available.
Major Decisions in the House and Senate on Social Security: 1935-2000
No Description Available.
Social Security: What Happens to Future Benefit Levels Under Various Reform Options
The report first examines several benefit-constraint options. Among them are raising the age at which full Social Security retirement benefits can be received, changing the way initial benefits are computed, and constraining cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs). It also illustrates the effects of creating new personal savings accounts and presents their projected impact as a supplement to, or partial replacement of, the existing system, or as a means to close the gap between the benefit levels promised by the existing system and what can be paid under its projected future income. Finally, because across-the-board cuts may be seen as too severe for several types of recipients, other options that would ameliorate their effects, including one that would raise revenue, are also illustrated.
Social Security and Medicare "Lock Boxes"
No Description Available.
Social Security Taxes: Where Do Surplus Taxes Go and How Are They Used?
No Description Available.
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?
No Description Available.
Social Security: The Cost-of-Living Adjustment in January 2002
This report discusses the Social Security recipients that receive a costof- living adjustment (COLA) in January of each year. An automatic Social Security benefit increase reflects the rise in the cost of living over roughly a 1-year period