Congressional Research Service Reports - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

Foreign Students in the United States: Policies and Legislation

Description: This report examines various issues pertaining to foreign students in the United States. Since the Immigration Act of 1924, the United States has expressly permitted foreign students to study in U.S. institutions. Most foreign students are at least 18 years old and are enrolled in higher education programs. Foreign students are generally considered to enrich cultural diversity of the educational experience for U.S. residents as well as enhance the reputation of U.S. universities as world-class institutions. Concerns have arisen in recent years that have caused Congress to take a new look at the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) provisions that govern their admission.
Date: January 24, 2003
Creator: Wasem, Ruth Ellen
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alien Eligibility for Public Assistance

Description: This report discusses the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, which affected alien eligibility for federal, state, and local government assistance programs, both imposing and broadening restrictions on a number of immigration benefits and programs.
Date: December 18, 1997
Creator: Vialet, Joyce & Eig, Larry M.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alien Eligibility for Public Assistance

Description: This report discusses the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, which affected alien eligibility for federal, state, and local government assistance programs, both imposing and broadening restrictions on a number of immigration benefits and programs.
Date: July 22, 1998
Creator: Vialet, Joyce & Eig, Larry M.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Central American Asylum Seekers: Impact of 1996 Immigration Law

Description: This report discuses issues related to the significant portion of the Central Americans affected by the IIRIRA revisions still have asylum cases pending and may obtain legal permanent residence by that avenue if they demonstrate a well-founded fear of persecution. The Attorney General also has the discretionary authority to grant blanket relief from deportation, but the discretionary forms of relief do not entail legal permanent residence. There is considerable interest in this issue in the 105th Congress, and the Senate passed by a vote of 99 to 1 an amendment to provide relief for certain Central Americans to the D.C. appropriations bill (S.1156).
Date: November 21, 1997
Creator: Wasem, Ruth Ellen
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department