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European Union Enlargement

Description: On May 1, 2004, 10 states joined the European Union (EU), enlarging the Union to 25 members. The EU views the enlargement process as an historic opportunity to promote stability in Europe and further the integration of the continent by peaceful means. In addition to the 10 new members (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia), three other states — Bulgaria, Romania, and Croatia — hope to accede to the EU by 2007. Turkey is also a candidate and is expected to begin accession negotiations in 2005. Macedonia has also applied for EU membership.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Archick, Kristin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

European Union Enlargement

Description: On May 1, 2004, 10 states joined the European Union (EU), enlarging the Union to 25 members. The EU views the enlargement process as an historic opportunity to promote stability in Europe and further the integration of the continent by peaceful means. In addition to the 10 new members (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia), three other states — Bulgaria, Romania, and Croatia — hope to accede to the EU by 2007. Turkey is also a candidate and is expected to begin accession negotiations in 2005. Macedonia has also applied for EU membership.
Date: June 10, 2005
Creator: Archick, Kristin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

European Union Enlargement

Description: On May 1, 2004, 10 states joined the European Union (EU), enlarging the Union to 25 members. The EU views the enlargement process as an historic opportunity to promote stability in Europe and further the integration of the continent by peaceful means. In addition to the 10 new members (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia), three other states — Bulgaria, Romania, and Croatia — hope to accede to the EU by 2007. Turkey is also a candidate and is expected to begin accession negotiations in 2005. Macedonia has also applied for EU membership.
Date: March 7, 2005
Creator: Archick, Kristin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Balkan Cooperation on War Crimes Issues: 2005 Update

Description: A combination of intensified international pressure and deadlines associated with Euro-Atlantic integration processes has prompted a spate of transfers of persons indicted for war crimes to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague in late 2004-early 2005. Full cooperation with The Hague tribunal has been established as a key prerequisite to further progress toward a shared long-term goal for the western Balkan countries: closer association with and eventual membership in the European Union (EU) and NATO. This report is updated as the number of individuals indicted for war crimes have been transferred to The Hague from Serbia, Kosovo, and Bosnia.
Date: June 9, 2005
Creator: Kim, Julie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China: Economic Sanctions

Description: This report discusses a list of economic sanctions that the United States currently maintains against China. The influence of Congress on U.S. policy toward China, once significant because so much hung on the annual possibility that favorable trade terms could be suspended, has more recently been diffused. Sanctions that remain in place today can all be modified, eased, or lifted altogether by the President, without congressional input.
Date: May 18, 2005
Creator: Rennack, Dianne E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China’s Currency: U.S. Options

Description: In recent years, the United States and China have disagreed whether China’s national currency, the yuan or renminbi, is properly valued compared to the U.S. dollar and whether China is manipulating its currency.1 The United States has pushed China to raise the value of its currency. Chinese officials say they want to make their exchange rate system more flexible, but China also needs long-term stability in its currency value in order to avoid dislocations. Chinese officials also say they will not bow to foreign pressure. China announced a new exchange rate procedure on July 21, 2005. This report summarizes this controversy, it describes actions and positions taken by the United States, China and other countries, and it discusses various approaches the United States might use to address this concern.
Date: July 29, 2005
Creator: Sanford, Jonathan E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China-U.S. Trade Issues

Description: U.S.-China economic ties have expanded substantially over the past several years. China is now the third largest U.S. trading partner, its second largest source of imports, and its fourth largest export market. However, U.S.-China commercial ties have been strained by a number of issues, including a surging U.S. trade deficit with China, China's refusal to float its currency, and failure to fully comply with its World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments, especially its failure to provide protection for U.S. intellectual property rights (IPR). This report explores these issues in detail, especially concerning the lack of protection for U.S. IPR.
Date: December 14, 2004
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Unrest in Uzbekistan: Context and Implications

Description: This report examines the large-scale domestic unrest that occurred in eastern Uzbekistan in May 2005 that resulted in hundreds of civilian casualties. The report discusses Implications for Uzbekistan and for its relations with the United States.
Date: June 8, 2005
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conditions on U.S. Aid to Serbia

Description: In each of the past five fiscal years (FY2001-FY2005), Congress has conditioned U.S. aid to Serbia on a presidential certification that Serbia has met certain conditions, including cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The 1 Ogth Congress is considering similar certification provisions in the FY2006 foreign aid bill. Supporters of aid conditionality say such provisions may have spurred Serbia's cooperation with the Tribunal. While the certification process continues to enjoy support in Congress, the Administration appears to favor ending it soon, as well as shifting responsibility for prosecuting war crimes from the ICTY to local courts.
Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Woehrel, Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Iraq: U.S. Regime Change Efforts and Post-Saddam Governance

Description: Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains violent and unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, as well as increasing sectarian violence. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security and does not serve as a host for radical Islamic terrorists. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S.
Date: January 13, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Policy Issues

Description: Congress has long been concerned about whether U.S. policy advances the national interest in reducing the role of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and missiles that could deliver them. China has taken some steps to mollify U.S. concerns about its role in weapons proliferation. Skeptics question whether China's cooperation in weapons nonproliferation has warranted President Bush's pursuit of stronger bilateral ties. This report discusses the national security problem of China's role in weapons proliferation and issues related to the U.S. policy response, including legislation, since the mid-1990s.
Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Kan, Shirley A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Assistance to the Former Soviet Union

Description: Since 1992, the United States has provided more than $26 billion in assistance to the 12 states of the former Soviet Union (FSU). It continues to provide nearly $2 billion annually. This report describes the broad framework of U.S. assistance programs and policies in the region and then focuses on the FREEDOM Support Act (FSA) account under the foreign operations budget which, encompassing all U.S. objectives in the region, has often been the means by which Congress has expressed its views and sought to influence policy.
Date: January 12, 2006
Creator: Tarnoff, Curt
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bosnia: Overview of Issues Ten Years After Dayton

Description: On November 21-22, 2005, the United States will host a meeting with Bosnia’s collective leadership to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Dayton accords, an agreement brokered under U.S. leadership that ended the 1992-1995 conflict in Bosnia- Herzegovina. Since early 2005, the Bush Administration has given renewed emphasis to “unfinished business” in the western Balkan region, such as the unresolved status of Kosovo, a U.N.-run province of Serbia. The United States also seeks to bolster Bosnia’s further development as a unified, democratic, and stable state on the path toward Euro- Atlantic integration, including major constitutional reforms. This report provides an overview of prominent current issues concerning Bosnia and will be updated after the 10th anniversary meeting in Washington.
Date: November 14, 2005
Creator: Kim, Julie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Japan's Response to the Persian Gulf Crisis: Implications for U.S. -Japan Relations

Description: This report provides information and analysis for use by Members of Congress as they deliberate on the Japanese response to the Gulf crisis and, perhaps more important, what it may mean for future U.S.-Japanese relations. The first chapter briefly reviews Japanese government actions in response to the crisis, from August 1990 to February 1991. A second section examines in detail the various factors and constraints that affected Japanese policy. The final section offers conclusions and examines implications of the episode for future U.S.-Japanese relations. Published sources for the report are cited in footnotes.
Date: May 23, 1991
Creator: Niksch, Larry A. & Sutter, Robert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Libya: Background and U.S. Relations

Description: This report provides background information on Libya and U.S.-Libyan relations; profiles Libyan leader Muammar al Qadhafi; discusses Libya’s political and economic reform efforts; and reviews current issues of potential congressional interest.
Date: November 4, 2005
Creator: Blanchard, Christopher M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department