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World Bank Legislation Before the 99th Congress

Description: The 99th Congress has before it several proposals to authorize additional U.S. contributions to multilateral development banks. These include potential subscriptions or contributions to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the African Development Fund (AFDF), and the special African aid facility of the International Development Association (IDA). There is no legislation now before Congress to authorize new contributions to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the regular budget of the IDA, or any of the other regional development banks. These have been dealt with in previous years. This paper provides some background on the World Bank and a summary of the pending legislation.
Date: July 26, 1985
Creator: Sanford, Jonathan E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

World Bank Legislation Before the 99th Congress

Description: The 99th Congress has before it several proposals to authorize additional U.S. contributions to multilateral development banks. These include potential subscriptions or contributions to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the African Development Fund (AFDF), and the special African aid facility of the International Development Association (IDA). There is no legislation now before Congress to authorize new contributions to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the regular budget of the IDA, or any of the other regional development banks. These have been dealt with in previous years. This paper provides some background on the World Bank and a summary of the pending legislation.
Date: July 26, 1985
Creator: Sanford, Jonathan E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Consumer Bankruptcy Reform: Proposals Before the 105th Congress

Description: This report examines current consumer bankruptcy practice and the proposals set forth in the reform bills. Also considered are the legislative history of the current consumer bankruptcy scheme, and topics likely to be debated as Congress proceeds to consider consumer bankruptcy reform.
Date: March 20, 1998
Creator: Jeweler, Robin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Campaign Finance Reform Bills in the 105th Congress: Comparison of H.R. 3581 (Thomas), H.R. 3526 (Shays-Meehan), and Current Law

Description: On March 30, 1998, the House considered four campaign reform bills under a suspension of rules, focusing on the comprehensive H.R. 3581, offered that day for the Republican leadership by Mr. Thomas; it failed passage on a 74-337 vote. (The bill was similar to H.R. 3485, also by Mr. Thomas, reported by the House Oversight Committee March 18.1) The bill generating the most publicity in the 105th Congress has been S. 25 (McCain-Feingold),2 introduced on March 19 as H.R. 3526 by Messrs. Shays and Meehan. This report summarizes and compares H.R. 3581, H.R. 3526, and current law.
Date: April 13, 1998
Creator: Cantor, Joseph E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Campaign Finance Bills in the 107th Congress: Comparison of S. 27 (McCain-Feingold), H.R. 2356 (Shays-Meehan), H.R. 2360 (Ney-Wynn), and Current Law

Description: This report summarizes and compares three major campaign finance reform bills before the 107th Congress and current law (in most cases, the Federal Election Campaign Act, or FECA, 2 U.S.C. § 431 et seq.).
Date: July 5, 2001
Creator: Cantor, Joseph E. & Whitaker, L. Paige
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Financial Services Regulatory Relief in the 109th Congress: H.R. 3505 and S. 2856

Description: This report gives an overview of the major regulatory relief provisions in H.R. 3505 and S. 2856, focusing on their potential impact on bank concentration. The report examines both bills’ provisions to assess whether they are likely to support or discourage bank consolidation. The consolidation of the banking industry arguably reduces competition, which could tend to raise the price of banking services. On the other hand, there is empirical evidence that shows economies of scale in banking, including economies in complying with banking regulations, suggesting larger banks might be able to provide banking services at lower cost than smaller banks.
Date: July 24, 2006
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Economic Effects of Raising National Saving

Description: Raising the share of income we save is a frequent aim of public policy. That may be particularly apparent in debates about the size of the federal budget deficit, but concerns about the low household saving rate have also prompted policymakers to consider ways to encourage individuals to save more. How much individuals save will directly affect their future economic well-being, but from a macroeconomic perspective, the source of saving — be it households, business, or government — makes no difference. This report presents standard economic analysis of the macroeconomic effects of raising saving.
Date: October 4, 2005
Creator: Cashell, Brian W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Consumer Proposals in the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1998: H.R. 3150, 105th Congress, 2d Session (1998)

Description: This report considers the legislative history of the current consumer bankruptcy scheme. It examines current consumer bankruptcy practice and surveys the consumer proposals set forth in Title I of H.R. 3150, with an emphasis on the likely impact of the bill on family support obligations.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Jeweler, Robin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002: Summary and Comparison with Previous Law

Description: The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 was enacted on March 27, 2002 as P.L. 107-155. It passed the House on February 14, 2002, as H.R. 2356 (Shays- Meehan), by a 240-189 vote. Its companion measure, on which it was largely based, had initially been passed by the Senate in 2001 as S. 27 (McCain-Feingold). On March 20, 2002, however, the Senate approved the House-passed H.R. 2356 by a 60- 40 vote, thus avoiding a conference to reconcile differences between S. 27 and H.R. 2356. The two primary features of P.L. 107-155 are restrictions on party soft money and issue advocacy.
Date: May 3, 2002
Creator: Cantor, Joseph E. & Whitaker, L. Paige
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Campaign Finance Bills in the 107th Congress: Comparison of S. 27 (McCain-Feingold), H.R. 2356 (Shays-Meehan), H.R. 2630 (Ney-Wyn), and Current Law

Description: S. 27 (McCain-Feingold), the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001, was introduced January 22, 2001 in a form similar to prior versions of the last two Congresses. On April 2, after a two-week debate and adoption of 22 amendments, the Senate passed S. 27 by a vote of 59-41. That measure’s companion Shays-Meehan bill, the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act of 2001, was initially introduced as H.R. 380 in a form similar to House-passed versions of the prior two Congresses; on June 28, the bill was modified and offered as H.R. 2356. H.R. 2360 (Ney-Wynn), the Campaign Finance Reform and Grassroots Citizen Participation Act of 2001, was introduced and ordered reported favorably by the House Administration Committee on June 28. (Shays-Meehan was ordered reported unfavorably at the same time.) The two primary features of the bills are restrictions on party soft money and issue advocacy.
Date: January 18, 2002
Creator: Cantor, Joseph E. & Whitaker, L. Paige
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department