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Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation

Description: This report discusses the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) of 2000 which reauthorized most of the original act’s programs and created new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse (administered by HHS), and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, created a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence.
Date: July 15, 2004
Creator: Laney, Garrine P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Administrative Separations for Misconduct: An Alternative or Companion to Military Courts-Martial

Description: The recent reports of abuse of prisoners held by U.S. military personnel have raised questions about how the armed forces control servicemembers. Congress, under the authorities vested in it by the U.S. Constitution, has enacted procedures for addressing misconduct by servicemembers. One such procedure is an administrative separation under which a member’s continued suitability for service is determined. Administrative separations are non-punitive and can be initiated for a number of reasons, including misconduct or criminal offenses. They may be used in place of or after the servicemember has been subject to a court-martial or nonjudicial punishment. This report provides an overview of administrative separations as an alternative or companion to courts-martial.
Date: May 26, 2004
Creator: Velez Pollack, Estela I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civil Charges in Corporate Scandals

Description: This report lists civil suites filled by federal regulatory agencies charging individuals and corporations with violations related to these scandals. The list is limited to corporations and their offices or employees that fit within the Enron pattern. That is, these are cases that display one or more of the following: irregular accounting and auditing, management self-dealing, conflicts of interests between firms and financial advisors (or Wall Street firms and their costumers), and manipulation or abusive trading in energy markets.
Date: April 8, 2004
Creator: Jickling, Mark & Janov, Paul H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department