Participatory Learning Through Social Media: How and Why Social Studies Educators Use Twitter

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This article draws on Deweyan conceptions of participatory learning and citizenship aims of the field as lenses through which to consider social media activities.

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22 p.

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Krutka, Daniel G. & Carpenter, Jeffrey P. 2016.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Education to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 40 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

This article draws on Deweyan conceptions of participatory learning and citizenship aims of the field as lenses through which to consider social media activities.

Physical Description

22 p.

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Abstract: The microblogging service Twitter offers a platform that social studies educators increasingly use for professional development, communication, and class activities, but to what ends? The authors drew on Deweyan conceptions of participatory learning and citizenship aims of the field as lenses through which to consider social media activities. To determine how and why social studies educators use Twitter, 303 K-16 self-identified social studies educators were surveyed in this study. Results from respondents suggested that they valued the professional development experiences afforded by the platform, but were less likely to utilize Twitter for communication or class activities. Themes and examples that point to ways social studies educators use Twitter are described to provide insights for educators aiming to use social media professionally. Questions are also raised concerning whether social studies educators have missed opportunities to use social media to connect across racial and cultural boundaries and for civic purposes.

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  • Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 2016. Waynesville, NC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education

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  • Publication Title: Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education
  • Volume: 16
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 38-59
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • 2016

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  • Sept. 17, 2017, 6:24 p.m.

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Krutka, Daniel G. & Carpenter, Jeffrey P. Participatory Learning Through Social Media: How and Why Social Studies Educators Use Twitter, article, 2016; Waynesville, North Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc993390/: accessed December 12, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Education.