Hurricanes, Oil Spills, and Discrimination, Oh My: The Story of the Mississippi Cottage

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This article demonstrates how, following Hurricane Katrina, local governments enacted discriminatory housing policies that made it difficult for residents to site permanent Mississippi Cottages.

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20 p.

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Evans-Cowley, Jennifer & Canter, Andrew February 2011.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by University of North Texas to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 13 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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This article demonstrates how, following Hurricane Katrina, local governments enacted discriminatory housing policies that made it difficult for residents to site permanent Mississippi Cottages.

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20 p.

Notes

Abstract: Immediately following Hurricane Katrina, the Mississippi Governor’s Commission for Recovery, Rebuilding, and Renewal collaborated with the Congress for the New Urbanism to generate rebuilding proposals for the Mississippi Gulf Coast. One of the ideas to emerge from this partnership was the Katrina Cottage—a small home that could improve upon the FEMA trailer. The state of Mississippi participated in the resulting Alternative Housing Pilot Program, which was funded by the U.S. Congress. Over five years after Katrina, what are the regulatory barriers local governments have put in place to limit the siting of Mississippi Cottages? Are the strategies that local governments are using a violation of state and federal laws, including the Fair Housing Act? While the Mississippi Cottage program provided citizens with needed housing following Hurricane Katrina, there are significant policy and implementation challenges to providing post-disaster housing

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  • Environmental Law Reporter, 2011. Washington, DC: Environmental Law Institute

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  • Publication Title: Environmental Law Reporter
  • Volume: 41
  • Issue: 2
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • February 2011

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  • Sept. 17, 2017, 6:24 p.m.

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Evans-Cowley, Jennifer & Canter, Andrew. Hurricanes, Oil Spills, and Discrimination, Oh My: The Story of the Mississippi Cottage, article, February 2011; Washington, DC. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc993376/: accessed May 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting University of North Texas.