Lessons from #McKinney: Social Media and the Interactive Construction of Police Brutality

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Description

This article explores how users of three social media platforms interpreted the June 2015 incident in which a police officer attempted to apprehend an African-American girl at a pool party in McKinney, Texas.

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30 p.

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Clark, Meredith D.; Bland, Dorothy & Livingston, Jo Ann 2017.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 388 times , with 23 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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This article explores how users of three social media platforms interpreted the June 2015 incident in which a police officer attempted to apprehend an African-American girl at a pool party in McKinney, Texas.

Physical Description

30 p.

Notes

Abstract: Video evidence of police aggression and assault on civilians has previously been considered irrefutable evidence of misconduct; its circulation contributes to the creation of “celebrated cases” of police brutality that draw attention because of their high-profile nature. In June 2015, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter comments on a citizen-captured video of a police officer attempting to apprehend an African-American girl at a pool party in McKinney, Texas, trended as one incident in the #BlackLivesMatter movement’s canon of police mistreatment of African-American citizens. Through the lens of critical race theory, this qualitative content analysis triangulates data from three social media platforms to explore how users interpreted the incident. This study develops insights on how a “celebrated case” of police brutality is constructed by social media audiences. It makes a significant contribution to the literature by focusing on the often-overlooked experiences of African-American women and girls as victims of police brutality.

Source

  • The Journal of Social Media in Society, 2017. Stephenville, TX: Texas Social Media Resarch Institute

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  • Publication Title: The Journal of Social Media in Society
  • Volume: 6
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 284-313
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • 2017

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 29, 2017, 9:38 a.m.

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Past 30 days: 23
Total Uses: 388

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Clark, Meredith D.; Bland, Dorothy & Livingston, Jo Ann. Lessons from #McKinney: Social Media and the Interactive Construction of Police Brutality, article, 2017; Stephenville, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc991008/: accessed October 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism.