Am I Disclosing Too Much? Student Perceptions of Teacher Credibility via Facebook Introduction

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This article examines the effects of teacher self-disclosure via Facebook on perceived teacher credibility.

Physical Description

33 p.

Creation Information

Wang, Zuoming; Novak, Hannah; Traylor, Sarah & Zhou, YuanYuan 2015.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 184 times , with 21 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism

The Mayborn has been a major provider of professionals and academics for all forms of media, profit and nonprofit communication organizations since 1945. Alumni of the school have received many awards, including a number of Pulitzer Prizes.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This article examines the effects of teacher self-disclosure via Facebook on perceived teacher credibility.

Physical Description

33 p.

Notes

Abstract: This study examined the effects of teacher self-disclosure via Facebook on perceived teacher credibility. Undergraduate students (N=92) were randomly assigned to view one of the eight versions of the Facebook webpage of a teacher (either male or female) that involved two types of self-disclosure: images of alcohol drinking, and a narrative with emotionally-loaded language. The credibility ratings of the teacher indicated that revealing information about alcohol consumption and emotional problems concerning a personal relationship negatively influence student perception of teacher credibility. However, several gender differences emerged, indicating that an inherent bias exists in perceptions of credibility and appropriate self-disclosure. Specifically, male teachers were perceived more credible than female teachers in general. Moreover, the emotionally-loaded self-disclosure did not influence the female teacher's credibility, but did reduce the male teacher’s credibility. Credibility was also influenced by the physical attractiveness of the teacher and the belief whether it is acceptable for a teacher to have Facebook profile.

Source

  • The Journal of Social Media in Society, 2015. Stephenville, TX: Texas Social Media Resarch Institute

Language

Item Type

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: The Journal of Social Media in Society
  • Volume: 4
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 5-37
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • 2015

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 29, 2017, 9:38 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 21
Total Uses: 184

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Wang, Zuoming; Novak, Hannah; Traylor, Sarah & Zhou, YuanYuan. Am I Disclosing Too Much? Student Perceptions of Teacher Credibility via Facebook Introduction, article, 2015; Stephenville, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc990988/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism.