Fuzzy, Transparent, and Fast: Journalists and Public Relations Practitioners Characterize their Connections and Interactions in Social Media

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This article examines views on social media interactions between professionals through a mixed-methods study based on a survey including open-ended responses from 167 journalists and public relations practitioners.

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17 p.

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Chimbel, Aaron; Everbach, Tracy & Lambiase, Jacqueline May 2014.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 34 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism

The Mayborn has been a major provider of professionals and academics for all forms of media, profit and nonprofit communication organizations since 1945. Alumni of the School have received many awards, including a number of Pulitzer Prizes.

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Description

This article examines views on social media interactions between professionals through a mixed-methods study based on a survey including open-ended responses from 167 journalists and public relations practitioners.

Physical Description

17 p.

Notes

Abstract: This mixed-methods study, based on a survey including open-ended responses from 167 journalists and public relations practitioners, examines views on social media interactions between these professionals. Grounded in journalism ethics and news production research, the study examines how professionals navigate rapidly changing social media. Results show journalists and PR practitioners see themselves as working in the same digital space. Journalists and PR professionals responded that it was ethical to become social media “friends” and followers with each other. Still, these relationships are evolving.

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  • The Journal of Social Media in Society, 2014. Stephenville, TX: Texas Social Media Resarch Institute

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  • Publication Title: The Journal of Social Media in Society
  • Volume: 3
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 28-44
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • May 2014

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 29, 2017, 9:38 a.m.

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Chimbel, Aaron; Everbach, Tracy & Lambiase, Jacqueline. Fuzzy, Transparent, and Fast: Journalists and Public Relations Practitioners Characterize their Connections and Interactions in Social Media, article, May 2014; Stephenville, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc990955/: accessed June 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism.