Graphene Magnetic Tunnel Junction Spin Filters and Methods of Making

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Description

Patent relating to methods of forming a few molecule thick graphene layer on a ferromagnetic layer, at temperatures and conditions consistent with integration with silicon-based complementary metal oxide semiconductors (Si CMOS).

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10 p. : ill.

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Kelber, Jeffry A. & Zhou, Mi February 7, 2017.

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This patent is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 17 times . More information about this patent can be viewed below.

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Description

Patent relating to methods of forming a few molecule thick graphene layer on a ferromagnetic layer, at temperatures and conditions consistent with integration with silicon-based complementary metal oxide semiconductors (Si CMOS).

Physical Description

10 p. : ill.

Notes

Abstract: A Tunnel Magnetic Junction of high magnetoresistance is prepared at temperatures and pressure consistent with Si CMOS fabrication and operation. A first metal layer of cobalt or nickel is grown on an interconnect or conductive array line of e.g., copper. The metal layer is formed by electron beam irradiation. Annealing at UHV at temperatures below 700K yields a carbon segregation that forms a few layer thick (average density 3.5 ML) graphene film on the metal layer. Formation of a second layer of metal on top of the graphene barrier layer yields a high performance MTJ.

Prior Publication Data: US 2014/0151826 A1, Jun. 5, 2014

Related U.S. Application Data: Provisional application No. 61/490,650, filed on May 27, 2011.

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  • May 25, 2012

Accepted Date

  • February 7, 2017

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  • February 7, 2017

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  • Aug. 29, 2017, 9:38 a.m.

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Kelber, Jeffry A. & Zhou, Mi. Graphene Magnetic Tunnel Junction Spin Filters and Methods of Making, patent, February 7, 2017; Washington, D.C.. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc990954/: accessed June 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.