Invasive American mink Mustela vison in wetlands of the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, southern Chile: what are they eating?

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This article discusses invasive American mink Mustela vison and its ecological effect in wetlands of the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, southern Chile.

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4 p.

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Ibarra, J. Tomás; Fasola, Laura; MacDonald, David W. (David Whyte); Rozzi, Ricardo, 1960- & Bonacic, Cristián January 2009.

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This article discusses invasive American mink Mustela vison and its ecological effect in wetlands of the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, southern Chile.

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4 p.

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This article is © Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605308099997

Abstract: The impact of alien American mink on the native fauna of oceanic islands has been demonstrated in a number of locations. In the sub-Antarctic Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve of southern Chile the species is currently expanding in an area where the native fauna evolved in the absence of terrestrial predators. To evaluate any emerging problems, the authors therefore investigated seasonal variation in prey use by mink on Navarino Island within the Reserve. The authors identified undigested remains in 414 scats collected from the shores of 27 ponds over January-November 2006. Diet consisted mainly of mammals and birds. Mammals, including both native and exotic rodents, were the predominant prey in all seasons but birds were of equal importance during the summer (when birds breed and their abundance and diversity increases on the island). Exotic rodents were the only identifiable mammalian prey item during winter. Native wetlands birds constituted a substantial proportion of mink diet, and greater than that reported in other areas. Many birds breeding on Navarino Island are ground-nesting, a strategy that evolved in the absence of native mammalian predators. Considering the international importance of this region, the authors' results emphasize the need for an assessment of the impact of mink predation on the populations of native prey.

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  • Fauna and Flora International, Oryx, 2009, New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 87-90

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  • Publication Title: Fauna and Flora International, Oryx
  • Volume: 43
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 87
  • Page End: 90
  • Pages: 4
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • January 2009

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  • Aug. 17, 2012, 12:16 p.m.

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  • July 22, 2013, 1:21 p.m.

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Ibarra, J. Tomás; Fasola, Laura; MacDonald, David W. (David Whyte); Rozzi, Ricardo, 1960- & Bonacic, Cristián. Invasive American mink Mustela vison in wetlands of the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, southern Chile: what are they eating?, article, January 2009; [New York, New York]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97948/: accessed October 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.