Integrando la Ciencia y la Sociedad a través de la Investigación Socio-Ecológica de Largo Plazo

One of 42 articles in the series: Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program available on this site.

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This article discusses integrating science and society through long-term socio-ecological research.

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19 p.

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Anderson, Christopher B.; Likens, Gene E., 1935-; Rozzi, Ricardo, 1960-; Gutiérrez, Julio R., 1953-; Armesto, Juan J., 1953- & Poole, Alexandria 2008.

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  • Main Title: Integrando la Ciencia y la Sociedad a través de la Investigación Socio-Ecológica de Largo Plazo
  • Alternate Title: Integrating Science and Society through Social-Ecological Research Long Term
  • Series Title: Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program

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Description

This article discusses integrating science and society through long-term socio-ecological research.

Physical Description

19 p.

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Abstract: Long-term ecological research (LTER), addressing problems that encompass decadal or longer time frames, began as a formal term and program in the United States in 1980. While long-term ecological studies and observation began as early as the 1400s and 1800s in Asia and Europe, respectively, the long-term approach was not formalized until the establishment of the U.S. long-term ecological research programs. These programs permitted ecosystem-level experiments and cross-site comparisons that led to insights into the biosphere's structure and function. The holistic ecosystem approach of this initiative also allowed the incorporation of the human-dimension of ecology and recently has given rise to a new concept of long-term socio-ecological research (LTSER). Today, long-term ecological research programs exist in at least thirty-two countries (i.e., members of the International Long-Term Ecological Research Network, ILTER). However, consolidation of the international network within the long-term socio-ecological research paradigm still requires: (1) inclusion of certain remote regions of the world, such as southwestern South America, that are still poorly represented; (2) modifications of the type of research conducted, such as integrating social and natural sciences with the humanities and ethics; and (3) the incorporation of findings and results into broader social and political processes. In this context, a nascent long-term socio-ecological research network in Chile, which extends over the longest latitudinal range of temperate forest in the Southern Hemisphere, adds a new remote region to international long-term ecological research previously overlooked. In addition, collaboration with the University of North Texas and other international partners helps to further develop an interdisciplinary approach for the integration of the ecological sciences and environmental philosophy together with traditional ecological knowledge, informal and formal education, policy, the humanities, socio-political processes, and biocultural conservation.

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  • Environmental Ethics, 2008, Denton: University of North Texas, pp. 81-99

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  • Publication Title: Environmental Ethics
  • Volume: 30
  • Issue: S3
  • Page Start: 81
  • Page End: 99
  • Pages: 19
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

The Scholarly Works Collection is home to materials from the University of North Texas community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and serves as UNT's Open Access Repository. It brings together articles, papers, artwork, music, research data, reports, presentations, and other scholarly and creative products representing the expertise in our university community.** Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.**

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Integrating Science and Society through Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research (Article)

Integrating Science and Society through Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research

This article discusses integrating science and society through long-term socio-ecological research.

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  • 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 17, 2012, 12:16 p.m.

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  • July 22, 2013, 1:07 p.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Anderson, Christopher B.; Likens, Gene E., 1935-; Rozzi, Ricardo, 1960-; Gutiérrez, Julio R., 1953-; Armesto, Juan J., 1953- & Poole, Alexandria. Integrando la Ciencia y la Sociedad a través de la Investigación Socio-Ecológica de Largo Plazo, article, 2008; [Denton, Texas]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97938/: accessed February 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.