Sleep in College Students

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In this University Scholars Day keynote address, Dr. Daniel J. Taylor presented the preliminary results from two of his recently completed studies in the Sleep Lab in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Texas.

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10 p.

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Taylor, Daniel J. April 3, 2008.

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This text is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Honors College to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 2148 times . More information about this text can be viewed below.

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In this University Scholars Day keynote address, Dr. Daniel J. Taylor presented the preliminary results from two of his recently completed studies in the Sleep Lab in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Texas.

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10 p.

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Abstract: In this University Scholars Day keynote address, Dr. Daniel J. Taylor presented the preliminary results from two of his recently completed studies in the Sleep Lab in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Texas. The first study was a cross-sectional epidemiological study examining sleep and insomnia among college students. The results of this study revealed that 75% of students were getting enough sleep but 15% reported having chronic insomnia and 11% reported having "short" nights in which they slept less than 4 hours. Most students reported sleeping more on the weekends than during the week. The second study was a treatment study where college students with chronic insomnia were randomly assigned to receive cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia or wait-list control. Cognitive-behavioral therapy was found to be effective in increasing the average number of hours spent sleeping and the average percentage of the total time in bed that the students were asleep.

The Eagle Feather: A Publication for Undergraduate Scholars. https://eaglefeather.honors.unt.edu

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  • The Eagle Feather, 2008, Denton: University of North Texas. Honors College

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  • Publication Title: The Eagle Feather
  • Issue: 2008
  • Volume: 5

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  • April 3, 2008

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  • Aug. 7, 2012, 1:52 p.m.

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  • March 20, 2017, 12:26 p.m.

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Taylor, Daniel J. Sleep in College Students, text, April 3, 2008; [Denton, Texas]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96839/: accessed June 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Honors College.