Bermuda Grass

One of 1,873 pamphlets in the series: Farmers' bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) available on this site.

Description

Bermuda grass is the most important perennial grass in the Southern States. It was introduced into the United States at least as early as 1806. Besides the common Bermuda grass, there are several varieties, the most important of which are the Giant, characterized by a very large growth, and St. Lucie grass, similar to ordinary Bermuda grass, but lacking underground rootstocks. Bermuda grass grows well mixed with lespedeza for a summer crop. Bur clover, black medic, and hairy vetch as winter crops alternate well with it. The best Bermuda-grass pastures of the South will usually carry two head of cattle ... continued below

Physical Description

19 p. : ill., 1 map ; 23 cm.

Creation Information

Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920 1917.

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This pamphlet is part of the collection entitled: USDA Farmers' Bulletins and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 184 times . More information about this pamphlet can be viewed below.

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Description

Bermuda grass is the most important perennial grass in the Southern States. It was introduced into the United States at least as early as 1806. Besides the common Bermuda grass, there are several varieties, the most important of which are the Giant, characterized by a very large growth, and St. Lucie grass, similar to ordinary Bermuda grass, but lacking underground rootstocks. Bermuda grass grows well mixed with lespedeza for a summer crop. Bur clover, black medic, and hairy vetch as winter crops alternate well with it. The best Bermuda-grass pastures of the South will usually carry two head of cattle per acre for eight months of the year. On poor soils the carrying capacity is not more than one cow per acre. On rich bottom land Bermuda grass grows tall enough to cut for hay. Under exceptional circumstances three or more cuttings may be secured in a season, giving total yields of from 6 to 10 tons of hay per acre. It will grow well on soils so alkaline that most other field crops, as well as fruits, will fail. The feeding value of Bermuda-grass hay compares closely wit that of timothy hay. Bermuda grass frequently is used to bind leaves and toe prevent hillsides from washing. The grass usually can be eradicated by growing two smother crops, a winter one of oats or rye, followed by a summer crop of cow peas or velvet beans." -- p. 2

Physical Description

19 p. : ill., 1 map ; 23 cm.

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"May, 1917." -- title page

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USDA Farmers' Bulletins

The United States Department of Agriculture Farmers' Bulletins were produced to disseminate information about agricultural topics. This collection includes bulletins published between the 1880's and the 1980's.

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Creation Date

  • 1917

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 7, 2012, 1:52 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • July 30, 2015, 7:11 p.m.

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Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920. Bermuda Grass, pamphlet, 1917; Washington D.C.. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96459/: accessed January 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.