Influence of Underlying Random Walk Types in Population Models on Resulting Social Network Types and Epidemiological Dynamics

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Epidemiologists rely on human interaction networks for determining states and dynamics of disease propagations in populations. However, such networks are empirical snapshots of the past. It will greatly benefit if human interaction networks are statistically predicted and dynamically created while an epidemic is in progress. We develop an application framework for the generation of human interaction networks and running epidemiological processes utilizing research on human mobility patterns and agent-based modeling. The interaction networks are dynamically constructed by incorporating different types of Random Walks and human rules of engagements. We explore the characteristics of the created network and compare them with ... continued below

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Kolgushev, Oleg Mikhailovich December 2016.

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  • Kolgushev, Oleg Mikhailovich

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Description

Epidemiologists rely on human interaction networks for determining states and dynamics of disease propagations in populations. However, such networks are empirical snapshots of the past. It will greatly benefit if human interaction networks are statistically predicted and dynamically created while an epidemic is in progress. We develop an application framework for the generation of human interaction networks and running epidemiological processes utilizing research on human mobility patterns and agent-based modeling. The interaction networks are dynamically constructed by incorporating different types of Random Walks and human rules of engagements. We explore the characteristics of the created network and compare them with the known theoretical and empirical graphs. The dependencies of epidemic dynamics and their outcomes on patterns and parameters of human motion and motives are encountered and presented through this research. This work specifically describes how the types and parameters of random walks define properties of generated graphs. We show that some configurations of the system of agents in random walk can produce network topologies with properties similar to small-world networks. Our goal is to find sets of mobility patterns that lead to empirical-like networks. The possibility of phase transitions in the graphs due to changes in the parameterization of agent walks is the focus of this research as this knowledge can lead to the possibility of disruptions to disease diffusions in populations. This research shall facilitate work of public health researchers to predict the magnitude of an epidemic and estimate resources required for mitigation.

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  • December 2016

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  • Feb. 19, 2017, 7:42 p.m.

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Kolgushev, Oleg Mikhailovich. Influence of Underlying Random Walk Types in Population Models on Resulting Social Network Types and Epidemiological Dynamics, dissertation, December 2016; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc955128/: accessed November 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .