Characterization of Single-Cylinder Small-Bore 4-Stroke CIDI Engine Combustion

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Direct injection diesel engines power most of the heavy-duty vehicles. Due to their superior fuel economy, high power density and low carbon dioxide emissions, turbocharged, small bore, high speed, direct injection diesel engines are being considered to power light duty vehicles. Such vehicles have to meet stringent emission standards. However, it is difficult to meet these standards by modifying the in-cylinder thermodynamic and combustion processes to reduce engine-out emissions. After-treatment devices will be needed to achieve even lower emission targets required in the production engines to account for the anticipated deterioration after long periods of operation in the field. To ... continued below

Creation Information

Henein, N A November 30, 2005.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Author

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Direct injection diesel engines power most of the heavy-duty vehicles. Due to their superior fuel economy, high power density and low carbon dioxide emissions, turbocharged, small bore, high speed, direct injection diesel engines are being considered to power light duty vehicles. Such vehicles have to meet stringent emission standards. However, it is difficult to meet these standards by modifying the in-cylinder thermodynamic and combustion processes to reduce engine-out emissions. After-treatment devices will be needed to achieve even lower emission targets required in the production engines to account for the anticipated deterioration after long periods of operation in the field. To reduce the size, mass and cost of the after-treatment devices, there is a need to reduce engine-out emissions and optimize both the engine and the aftertreatment devices as one integrated system. For example, the trade-off between engine-out NOx and PM, suggests that one of these species can be minimized in the engine, with a penalty in the other, which can be addressed efficiently in the after-treatment devices. Controlling engine-out emissions can be achieved by optimizing many engine design and operating parameters. The design parameters include, but are not limited to, the type of injection system: (CRS) Common Rail System, (HEUI ) Hydraulically Actuated and Electronically controlled Unit Injector, or (EUI) Electronic Unit Injector; engine compression ratio, combustion chamber design (bowl design), reentrance geometry, squish area and intake and exhaust ports design. With four-valve engines, the swirl ratio depends on the design of both the tangential and helical ports and their relative locations. For any specific engine design, the operating variables need also to be optimized. These include injection pressure, injection rate, injection duration and timing (pilot, main, and post injection), EGR ratio, and swirl ratio. The goal of the program is to gain a better understanding of the spray behavior under high injection pressures in small-bore, high compression ratio, high-speed, direct-injection diesel engines equipped with advanced fuel injection system. The final results demonstrate the capability of the engine in reducing the engine-out emissions and improve the trade-off between nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter, other emissions and fuel economy. This report introduces a new phenomenological model for the fuel distribution and combustion, and emissions formation in the small bore, high speed, direct injection diesel engine. This will be followed by an analysis of the effect of each of injection pressure, EGR, injection advance and retard and swirl ratio on engine-out emissions and fuel economy. A discussion will be given on the 2-D and 3-D trade of maps. Finally a discussion will be made on the low temperature combustion regimes, its major problems and proposed solutions.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: None
  • Grant Number: FG26-00AL66600
  • DOI: 10.2172/975487 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 975487
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc935256

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • November 30, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Nov. 22, 2016, 10:18 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 5

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Henein, N A. Characterization of Single-Cylinder Small-Bore 4-Stroke CIDI Engine Combustion, report, November 30, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc935256/: accessed November 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.