An atomistic study of dynamic brittle fracture in silicon

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Dynamic fracture has been modeled using a modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential for silicon. For Mode I dynamic fracture along (1 1 1) crystallographic planes, the molecular dynamics model predicts crack speeds and fracture energies in agreement with previous experimental results [l]. In this orientation, hcture occurs almost exclusively along (1 1 1) planes for energy release rates up to 30 J/m2. For Mode I fracture oriented initially on (1 10) planes, fracture occurs by cleavage on (1 10) planes for a static energy release rate (J,) less than 8 J/m2. For greater values of J,, the fracture surfaces ... continued below

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19 p.

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Swadener, J. G. (John G.); Baskes, M. I. (Michael I.) & Nastasi, Michael Anthony, January 1, 2002.

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Dynamic fracture has been modeled using a modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential for silicon. For Mode I dynamic fracture along (1 1 1) crystallographic planes, the molecular dynamics model predicts crack speeds and fracture energies in agreement with previous experimental results [l]. In this orientation, hcture occurs almost exclusively along (1 1 1) planes for energy release rates up to 30 J/m2. For Mode I fracture oriented initially on (1 10) planes, fracture occurs by cleavage on (1 10) planes for a static energy release rate (J,) less than 8 J/m2. For greater values of J,, the fracture surfaces switch to alternating (111) planes, which is in agreement with previous experimental results [2]. Crack speed predictions for the (1 10) orientation are somewhat In the atomistic simulations, the dynamically propagating cracks generate dislocations, which are primarily produced on the (1 1 1) and (1 10) planes. Differences in the type and quantity of dislocations produced have been observed for different orientations. Molecular dynamics has the ability to calculate the energy consumed by dislocations and other lattice defects produced during fracture and the total surface energy of the main crack, side branches and secondary cracks. The sum of the surface energy and the energy consumed by lattice defects determines the dynamic fracture less than the high speeds observed experimentally. toughness, J(v). The dynamic fkacture toughness has been found to vary linearly with J,. For the (111) orientation with cracks propagating in the [211] direction, J(v) asymptotically approached a value of 1/3 of J,. The remainder of the strain energy that is released during fracture is converted into kinetic energy at the crack tip during the fracture process, which occurs atom by atom.

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19 p.

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  • Submitted to 39th Annual Technical Meeting, Society of Engineering Science Dynamic Fracture Symposium, Oct. 2002

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  • Report No.: LA-UR-02-6589
  • Grant Number: none
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 976403
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc935148

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 1, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Dec. 12, 2016, 5:25 p.m.

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Swadener, J. G. (John G.); Baskes, M. I. (Michael I.) & Nastasi, Michael Anthony,. An atomistic study of dynamic brittle fracture in silicon, article, January 1, 2002; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc935148/: accessed May 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.