CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital planetary missions

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Knowledge of surface elemental composition is needed to understand the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Gamma rays and neutrons produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with surface materials can be detected from orbit and analyzed to determine composition. Using gamma ray spectroscopy, major rock forming elements such as Fe, Ti, Al, Si, Mg, and Ca can be detected. The accuracy of elemental abundance is limited by the resolution of the spectrometer. For space missions, scintillators such as BGO and NaI(Tl) have been used for gamma ray spectroscopy. New planetary science missions are being planned to explore Mars, ... continued below

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3 p.

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Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Storms, S. A. (Steven A.); Fuller, K. R. (Kenneth R.); Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.); Browne, M. C. (Michael C.); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery), et al. January 1, 2001.

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Description

Knowledge of surface elemental composition is needed to understand the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Gamma rays and neutrons produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with surface materials can be detected from orbit and analyzed to determine composition. Using gamma ray spectroscopy, major rock forming elements such as Fe, Ti, Al, Si, Mg, and Ca can be detected. The accuracy of elemental abundance is limited by the resolution of the spectrometer. For space missions, scintillators such as BGO and NaI(Tl) have been used for gamma ray spectroscopy. New planetary science missions are being planned to explore Mars, Mercury, the asteroid belt, and the outer planets. Significant improvements in the pulse height resolution relative to scintillation detectors can be made using CdZnTe, a new room temperature detector technology. For an orbiting instrument, a CdZnTe detector at least 16 cm{sup 3} in size is needed. A 4 x 4 array of 1-cm{sup 3} coplanar grid detectors can be manufactured that meets requirements for resolution and counting efficiency. The array will shielded from gamma rays produced in the spacecraft by a BGO detector. By improving pulse height resolution by a factor of three at low energy, the CdZnTe detector will be able to make accurate measurements of elements that are currently difficult to measure using scintillation technology. The BGO shield will provide adequate suppression of gamma rays originating in the spacecraft, enabling the gamma ray spectrometer to be mounted on the deck of a spacecraft. To test this concept, we are constructing a flight qualified, prototype CdZnTe detector array. The prototype consists of a 2 x 2 array of coplanar grid detectors. We will present the results of mechanical and electronic testing and radiation damage tests, and the performance of the array for gamma ray spectroscopy.

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3 p.

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  • "Submitted to: IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, San Diego, CA, November 4-10, 2001"

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  • Report No.: LA-UR-01-2958
  • Grant Number: none
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 975354
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc934418

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  • January 1, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Dec. 9, 2016, 10:56 p.m.

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Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Storms, S. A. (Steven A.); Fuller, K. R. (Kenneth R.); Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.); Browne, M. C. (Michael C.); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery), et al. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital planetary missions, article, January 1, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc934418/: accessed June 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.