Final master work plan: environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

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The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several ... continued below

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Burton, J. C. January 23, 2003.

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The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, including Agenda, Agra, Everest, and Frankfort. The Argonne ESC approach revolves around a multidisciplinary, team-oriented approach to problem solving. The basic features and steps of the QuickSite methodology are as follows: (1) A team of scientists with diverse expertise and strong field experience is required to make the process work. The Argonne team is composed of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, hydrogeologists, chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists, health and safety personnel, and regulatory staff, as well as technical support staff. Most of the staff scientists are at the Ph.D. level; each has on average, more than 15 years of experience. The technical team works together throughout the process. In other words, the team that plans the program also implements the program in the field and writes the reports. More experienced scientists do not remain in the office while individuals with lesser degrees or experience carry out the field work. (2) The technical team reviews, evaluates, and interprets existing data for the site and the contaminants there to determine which data sets are technically valid and can be used in initially designing the field program. A basic mistake sometimes made in the site characterization process is failure to use technically sound available data to form working hypotheses on hydrogeology, contaminant distribution, etc. for initial testing. (3) After assembling and interpreting existing data for the site, the entire technical team visits the site to identify as a group the site characteristics that might prohibit or enhance any particular technological approach. Logistic and community constraints are also identified at this point. (4) After the field visit, the team selects a suite of technologies appropriate to the problem and completes the design of the field program. No one technique works well at all sites, and a suite of techniques is necessary to delineate site features fully. In addition, multiple technologies are employed to increase confidence in conclusions about site features. Noninvasive and minimally invasive technologies are emphasized to minimize risk to the environment, the community, and the staff. In no case is the traditional approach of installing a massive number of monitoring wells followed. A dynamic work plan that outlines the program is produced for the sponsoring and regulatory agencies. The word ''dynamic'' is emphasized because the work plan is viewed as a guide, subject to modification, for the site characterization activity, rather than a document that is absolute and unchangeable. Therefore, the health and safety plan and the quality assurance/quality control plan must be broad and encompass all possible alterations to the plan. The cooperation of the regulating agency is essential in successful implementation of this process. The sponsoring and regulatory agencies are notified if significant changes to the site-specific work plan are necessary. (5) The entire team participates in the technical field program. Several technical activities are undertaken simultaneously. These may range from different surface geophysics investigations to vegetation sampling. Data from the various activities are reduced and interpreted each day by the technical staff. Various computer programs are used to visualize and integrate the data. However, people do the data interpretation and integration, not the computers, which are just one more tool at the site. At the end of the day, the staff members meet, review results, and modify the next day's program as necessary to optimize activities that are generating overlapping or confirming site details. Data are not arbitrarily discarded -- each finding must be explained and understood. Anomalous readings may be due to equipment malfunctions, laboratory error, or the inability of a technique to work in a given setting. The suite of selected technologies is adjusted in the field if necessary. (6) The end result of this process is the optimization of the field activity to produce a high-quality technical product that is cost and time effective.

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  • Report No.: ANL/ER/TR-02/004
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-06CH11357
  • DOI: 10.2172/972988 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 972988
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc933181

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  • January 23, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Sept. 21, 2017, 6:22 p.m.

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Burton, J. C. Final master work plan: environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision., report, January 23, 2003; United States. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc933181/: accessed April 21, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.