A new paradigm for geosciences information management

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Over the past two decades, geoscientists have been increasingly engaged in providing answers to complex environmental problems with significant societal, political, and economic consequences. Today, these scientists have to perform under increasingly greater visibility to stakeholders and the general public. Their activities are much more scrutinized with regards to economic pressure, litigation support and regulatory compliance than in the past. Their current work is built on decades of past work and in many cases will continue for decades to come. Stakeholders are increasingly evaluating raw data rather than just examining summaries in final reports. They also need assurance that proper ... continued below

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23 p.

Creation Information

Bolivar, Stephen L.; Nasser, K. (Khalil); Dorries, A. M. (Alison M.) & Canepa, Julie Ann January 1, 2002.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

Over the past two decades, geoscientists have been increasingly engaged in providing answers to complex environmental problems with significant societal, political, and economic consequences. Today, these scientists have to perform under increasingly greater visibility to stakeholders and the general public. Their activities are much more scrutinized with regards to economic pressure, litigation support and regulatory compliance than in the past. Their current work is built on decades of past work and in many cases will continue for decades to come. Stakeholders are increasingly evaluating raw data rather than just examining summaries in final reports. They also need assurance that proper data control and data quality procedures were followed. Geoscientists are now faced with a new paradigm, i.e. with the challenge of cost effectively collecting, managing, analyzing, and synthesizing enormous volumes of multidisciplinary and complex information. In addition, these data must be processed and disseminated in a way that allows the public to make informed and rational assessments on decisions that are proposed or have been made. The new paradigm is clear - client and stakeholder needs must be better met, and the systems used to store and generate data must meet these needs. This paper addresses the challenges and the implications of this new paradigm on geosciences information management in the 21st Century. It concludes with a case study for a successful implementation of the new paradigm in an environmental restoration project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that is operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). LANL is upgrading and reengineering its data and business processes to better address client, user and stakeholder issues regarding data accessibility, control and quality.

Physical Description

23 p.

Source

  • Submitted to: Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting, Denver, CO, Oct. 27-30, 2002

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  • Report No.: LA-UR-02-4646
  • Grant Number: none
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 976236
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc933161

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • January 1, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 12, 2016, 4:21 p.m.

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Bolivar, Stephen L.; Nasser, K. (Khalil); Dorries, A. M. (Alison M.) & Canepa, Julie Ann. A new paradigm for geosciences information management, article, January 1, 2002; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc933161/: accessed November 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.