The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes.

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A conceptual model of movement ecology has recently been advanced to explain all movement by considering the interaction of four elements: internal state, motion capacity, navigation capacities,and external factors. We modified this framework togenerate predictions for species richness dynamics of fragmented plant communities and tested them in experimental landscapes across a 7-year time series. We found that two external factors, dispersal vectors and habitat features, affected species colonization and recolonization in habitat fragments and their effects varied and depended on motion capacity. Bird-dispersed species richness showed connectivity effects that reached an asymptote over time, but no edge effects, whereas wind-dispersed ... continued below

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19078-19083

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Damschen, Ellen, I.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Orrock, John, L. & Tewlsbury, Joshua, J. December 1, 2008.

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A conceptual model of movement ecology has recently been advanced to explain all movement by considering the interaction of four elements: internal state, motion capacity, navigation capacities,and external factors. We modified this framework togenerate predictions for species richness dynamics of fragmented plant communities and tested them in experimental landscapes across a 7-year time series. We found that two external factors, dispersal vectors and habitat features, affected species colonization and recolonization in habitat fragments and their effects varied and depended on motion capacity. Bird-dispersed species richness showed connectivity effects that reached an asymptote over time, but no edge effects, whereas wind-dispersed species richness showed steadily accumulating edge and connectivity effects, with no indication of an asymptote. Unassisted species also showed increasing differences caused by connectivity over time,whereas edges had no effect. Our limited use of proxies for movement ecology (e.g., dispersal mode as a proxy for motion capacity) resulted in moderate predictive power for communities and, in some cases, highlighted the importance of a more complete understanding of movement ecology for predicting how landscape conservation actions affect plant community dynamics.

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19078-19083

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  • Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 49; Conference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

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  • Report No.: na
  • Grant Number: AI09-00SR22188
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0802037105 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 953634
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc932967

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  • December 1, 2008

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  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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Damschen, Ellen, I.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Orrock, John, L. & Tewlsbury, Joshua, J. The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes., article, December 1, 2008; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc932967/: accessed October 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.