Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

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The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse ... continued below

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Serres, Margrethe H. May 15, 2009.

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Description

The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the understanding of speciation and adaptation in Shewanella in relation to its metabolic and respiratory capabilities and its environmental interactions. Through the collaboration with several research groups focused on the biology of S. oneidensis MR-1 and other members of the Shewanella genus, we have been able to link bioinformatically based predictions and analyses to experimental data in a productive manner. In additon to improving our understanding of S. oneidensis MR-1, our work is also applicable to the understanding of other environmentally versatile microbes.

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  • Report No.: DOE/ER/63940-2
  • Grant Number: FG02-04ER63940
  • DOI: 10.2172/952450 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 952450
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc932483

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  • May 15, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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Serres, Margrethe H. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison., report, May 15, 2009; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc932483/: accessed September 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.