Development of Functionally Graded Materials for Manufacturing Tools and Dies and Industrial Processing Equipment

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Hot forming processes such as forging, die casting and glass forming require tooling that is subjected to high temperatures during the manufacturing of components. Current tooling is adversely affected by prolonged exposure at high temperatures. Initial studies were conducted to determine the root cause of tool failures in a number of applications. Results show that tool failures vary and depend on the operating environment under which they are used. Major root cause failures include (1) thermal softening, (2) fatigue and (3) tool erosion, all of which are affected by process boundary conditions such as lubrication, cooling, process speed, etc. While ... continued below

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57 pages ; 2 Megabytes

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Lherbier, Louis, W.; Novotnak, David, J.; Herling, Darrell, R. & Sears, James, W. March 23, 2009.

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Description

Hot forming processes such as forging, die casting and glass forming require tooling that is subjected to high temperatures during the manufacturing of components. Current tooling is adversely affected by prolonged exposure at high temperatures. Initial studies were conducted to determine the root cause of tool failures in a number of applications. Results show that tool failures vary and depend on the operating environment under which they are used. Major root cause failures include (1) thermal softening, (2) fatigue and (3) tool erosion, all of which are affected by process boundary conditions such as lubrication, cooling, process speed, etc. While thermal management is a key to addressing tooling failures, it was clear that new tooling materials with superior high temperature strength could provide improved manufacturing efficiencies. These efficiencies are based on the use of functionally graded materials (FGM), a new subset of hybrid tools with customizable properties that can be fabricated using advanced powder metallurgy manufacturing technologies. Modeling studies of the various hot forming processes helped identify the effect of key variables such as stress, temperature and cooling rate and aid in the selection of tooling materials for specific applications. To address the problem of high temperature strength, several advanced powder metallurgy nickel and cobalt based alloys were selected for evaluation. These materials were manufactured into tooling using two relatively new consolidation processes. One process involved laser powder deposition (LPD) and the second involved a solid state dynamic powder consolidation (SSDPC) process. These processes made possible functionally graded materials (FGM) that resulted in shaped tooling that was monolithic, bi-metallic or substrate coated. Manufacturing of tooling with these processes was determined to be robust and consistent for a variety of materials. Prototype and production testing of FGM tooling showed the benefits of the nickel and cobalt based powder metallurgy alloys in a number of applications evaluated. Improvements in tool life ranged from three (3) to twenty (20) or more times than currently used tooling. Improvements were most dramatic where tool softening and deformation were the major cause of tool failures in hot/warm forging applications. Significant improvement was also noted in erosion of aluminum die casting tooling. Cost and energy savings can be realized as a result of increased tooling life, increased productivity and a reduction in scrap because of improved dimensional controls. Although LPD and SSDPC tooling usually have higher acquisition costs, net tooling costs per component produced drops dramatically with superior tool performance. Less energy is used to manufacture the tooling because fewer tools are required and less recycling of used tools are needed for the hot forming process. Energy is saved during the component manufacturing cycle because more parts can be produced in shorter periods of time. Energy is also saved by minimizing heating furnace idling time because of less downtime for tooling changes.

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57 pages ; 2 Megabytes

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  • Report No.: DOE/GO/14036
  • Grant Number: FC36-04GO14036
  • DOI: 10.2172/949983 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 949983
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc932379

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • March 23, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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Lherbier, Louis, W.; Novotnak, David, J.; Herling, Darrell, R. & Sears, James, W. Development of Functionally Graded Materials for Manufacturing Tools and Dies and Industrial Processing Equipment, report, March 23, 2009; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc932379/: accessed April 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.