Microbial co-habitation and lateral gene transfer: what transposases can tell us

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Determining the habitat range for various microbes is not a simple, straightforward matter, as habitats interlace, microbes move between habitats, and microbial communities change over time. In this study, we explore an approach using the history of lateral gene transfer recorded in microbial genomes to begin to answer two key questions: where have you been and who have you been with? All currently sequenced microbial genomes were surveyed to identify pairs of taxa that share a transposase that is likely to have been acquired through lateral gene transfer. A microbial interaction network including almost 800 organisms was then derived from ... continued below

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Hooper, Sean D.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos & Kyrpides, Nikos C. March 1, 2009.

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Determining the habitat range for various microbes is not a simple, straightforward matter, as habitats interlace, microbes move between habitats, and microbial communities change over time. In this study, we explore an approach using the history of lateral gene transfer recorded in microbial genomes to begin to answer two key questions: where have you been and who have you been with? All currently sequenced microbial genomes were surveyed to identify pairs of taxa that share a transposase that is likely to have been acquired through lateral gene transfer. A microbial interaction network including almost 800 organisms was then derived from these connections. Although the majority of the connections are between closely related organisms with the same or overlapping habitat assignments, numerous examples were found of cross-habitat and cross-phylum connections. We present a large-scale study of the distributions of transposases across phylogeny and habitat, and find a significant correlation between habitat and transposase connections. We observed cases where phylogenetic boundaries are traversed, especially when organisms share habitats; this suggests that the potential exists for genetic material to move laterally between diverse groups via bridging connections. The results presented here also suggest that the complex dynamics of microbial ecology may be traceable in the microbial genomes.

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  • Journal Name: BioMed; Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 5

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  • Report No.: LBNL-1896E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 957403
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc932281

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  • March 1, 2009

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  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Nov. 18, 2016, 4:23 p.m.

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Hooper, Sean D.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos & Kyrpides, Nikos C. Microbial co-habitation and lateral gene transfer: what transposases can tell us, article, March 1, 2009; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc932281/: accessed June 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.