MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker

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MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal ... continued below

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Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore & Stompor, Radoslaw June 9, 2009.

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MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(1011) time samples, O(108) pixels and O(104) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analysing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

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  • Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Supplements

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  • Report No.: LBNL-2192E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 965777
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc931015

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  • June 9, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Nov. 18, 2016, 2:55 p.m.

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Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore & Stompor, Radoslaw. MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker, article, June 9, 2009; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc931015/: accessed October 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.