Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.

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Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal ... continued below

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45 p.

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Furst, Eric (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Dunn, Elissa (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Park, Jin-Gyu (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Merrill, Jason (Yale University, New Haven, CT) et al. September 1, 2009.

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Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

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45 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2009-6163
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/974889 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 974889
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc930437

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • September 1, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 6, 2016, 1:45 p.m.

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Furst, Eric (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Dunn, Elissa (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Park, Jin-Gyu (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Merrill, Jason (Yale University, New Haven, CT) et al. Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly., report, September 1, 2009; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc930437/: accessed September 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.