Stochastic Cooling of Antiprotons at the Tevatron

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The 1984 Nobel prize for physics was shared by Harvard University's Carlo Rubbia and CERN (The European Laboratory for Particle Physics located in Geneva, Switzerland) senior engineer, Simon van der Meer. Rubbia led one of the two experimental teams at CERN which discovered the greatly anticipated elementary particles called the W{sup +}, W{sup -}, and Z{sup 0}. The electrically charged W's and neutral Z{sup 0} are quite heavy in comparison to the other most elementary constituents of matter. Their masses are about 81 GeV (giga, or billion electron volts) for the W's and 93 GeV for the Z{sup 0}. By ... continued below

Creation Information

Mtingwa, S. January 1, 1986.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Author

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

The 1984 Nobel prize for physics was shared by Harvard University's Carlo Rubbia and CERN (The European Laboratory for Particle Physics located in Geneva, Switzerland) senior engineer, Simon van der Meer. Rubbia led one of the two experimental teams at CERN which discovered the greatly anticipated elementary particles called the W{sup +}, W{sup -}, and Z{sup 0}. The electrically charged W's and neutral Z{sup 0} are quite heavy in comparison to the other most elementary constituents of matter. Their masses are about 81 GeV (giga, or billion electron volts) for the W's and 93 GeV for the Z{sup 0}. By comparison, the proton mass is close to 1 GeV. According to our present understanding, there are four basic forces which govern how objects in nature interact with one another. They are the gravitational, weak, electromagnetic and the strong forces. Physicists believe that the way two elementary particles interact is that one particle emits some mediator of one of the basic forces and the other particle subsequently absorbs this mediator, thereby altering their energy states. Thus, familiar electromagnetic phenomena occur via the emission and absorption of light particles called photons, which we detect everyday with our eyes. The existence of the W's and Z{sup 0} is crucial to our understanding of beta decay, perhaps the most famous example of the weak interaction. In beta decay, a neutron decays into a proton, an electron and an antineutrino. Hence, the discovery of the W's and Z{sup 0} as the mediators of the weak force greatly substantiated our theoretical framework. The W's and Z{sup 0} were produced at CERN by colliding a beam containing 270 GeV protons into a beam of 270 GeV antiprotons in a circular accelerator ring about four miles around called the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron). By accelerator ring we mean a system of magnets which guide and focus a beam of charged particles along a well-defined path. Antiprotons do not normally exist in large enough quantities to be useful for such experiments. However, they are produced regularly in high energy accelerator collisions, but the range of values of their momenta coming out of such collisions is much too large to be readily. useful. Also, the antiprotons oscillate (called betatron oscillations) with large amplitudes transverse to their longitudinal direction of motion so that the beam would appear large and diffuse to an observer looking directly at the approaching antiprotons.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: FERMILAB-PBAR-NOTE-445
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • DOI: 10.2172/948899 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 948899
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc930283

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • January 1, 1986

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 7, 2016, 10:32 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Congratulations! It looks like you are the first person to view this item online.

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Mtingwa, S. Stochastic Cooling of Antiprotons at the Tevatron, report, January 1, 1986; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc930283/: accessed July 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.